Emerson

Performace Tips, Advanced Technique and More

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FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Emerson

Post by FluterJenn » Thu Nov 20, 2003 6:57 pm

Hi, I have an Emerson open holded, b-foot flute with a silver
headjoint and silver plated body. I was just wondering what everyone''s
thoughts on Emerson was. I know some people perfer the "darker" tone it produces
while others don''t. I''m often very glad I have an Emerson while playing in
the low octave, but it certainly is a challenge to make the higher octaves sound
really good. Do you think it would be better to get a better flute for an
advancing player? I was thinking about the Jupiter diMedici I tryed one out
during the summer and it was a really amazing flute to play on, any other
suggestions?

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Emerson

Post by Penny » Thu Nov 20, 2003 8:00 pm

Did you demo the one at Cadence? Pretty decent instrument.
Wasn't impressed with Emerson but unless you are willing to get into serious
dollars all the student/intermediate flutes will have limitations and drawbacks.
Sonare made by Powell is about the same price as the DeMedici, try it over at
American Music and see which you like better.

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Emerson

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Fri Nov 21, 2003 3:23 pm

my friend plays a Jupiter Midici. Shes been playing it for
about 4 years but she doesnt want me getting one she says it's not worth it and
there are better flutes out there. P.S. she is like the best flute player in my
town
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Emerson

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Fri Nov 21, 2003 3:24 pm

my typo i am so bad at remembering stuff Jupiter diMedici
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Emerson

Post by Penny » Fri Nov 21, 2003 4:46 pm

I would second your freinds opinion on the Jupiter. Have your
freind try different headjoints. The scale is about the same as the one on the
much better Altus(same parent company I believe) so the body can be useful.
Upgrading the headjoint could give her a more positive opinion of the
instrument. Funny the Jupiter has a much better body than the Sonare I spoke of
and the Sonare's Powell headjoint is far superior to the one on the Jupiter. A
compromise either way. Usually the case I am finding out until you approach the
$3,000 mark. But I do agree it is a bit pricey for what you get.

User avatar
embum79
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 11:55 pm

Emerson

Post by embum79 » Wed Dec 17, 2003 8:39 pm

If you're going to upgrade from an Emerson, I'm not sure if
the Jupiter would be the way to go. I had an Emerson for years, and loved it. It
got me through high school and into college. I knew it was time for something
better when I was just trying too hard to get a sound I wanted. I had to wait a
few years to have some money before I could upgrade, I got a Sankyo Artist
model. From what I've read and seen, Jupiter is around the same quality as the
Emerson.. although everyone sounds a little bit different. I had a student try
the Jupiter, and it just seemed so LOUD. I really didn't like it.. but that's
just me. And I dunno.. there's just something about buying a flute from a
company that also makes tubas.... lol.[:bigsmile:]
Cheers,
Emily

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Emerson

Post by Penny » Wed Dec 17, 2003 9:39 pm

deMedici is different from the Jupiter student flutes. It is
definetly a significant upgrade from an Emerson. While it isn't up to the pro
level instruments it definetly is a quality mid level. Made more like an Altus
Jr. than a Jupiter big brother. The body on a deMedici and mechanism are in my
opinion very good. I think the headjoints leave something to be desired. But
that also makes it a nice move up. Because when you really get good enough to
know what you want you can buy a really nice Headjoint to put on the
deMedici.

FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Emerson

Post by FluterJenn » Fri Dec 19, 2003 2:12 pm

well i love the sound of an Emerson, when you can play it very
well. It takes alot of work for anyone (at least the very few people ive met) to
get a really good sound on an Emerson. The dark tone of it is really nice once
you can acheive it sounding good. My problem is, it is constanly needed to be
repaired and after playing a DeMedic I loved the feel of it so much more. I'm
not sure if its just because I haven't really played on that many different
instruments, but I really liked it. Recently ive also been considering
Yamaha's. Not a student model, but an open hole, b foot, all solid silver,
french pointed arms, inline. Im not sure what model that is. what is your feel
on Yamahas? i dont believe in student model yamaha's at all, but i think the
higher level flutes and also their piccolos are good.

FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Emerson

Post by FluterJenn » Fri Dec 19, 2003 2:13 pm

p.s. jupiter makes tubas??

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

Emerson

Post by MattMom » Fri Dec 19, 2003 9:57 pm

Hey Jenn, I think they removed this feature from their site
recently, but JL Smith (flutesmith.com) used to have blurbs about the different
flute makers. They said that Emerson was a flute to "watch". Someone new
recently purchased the company, and they were making incredible advances (again,
according to the site). I've never tried one personally, so can't give you my
opinion there. They have their own forum, with some great moderators, and they
can give you some suggestions. On the high register - low register thing: I
recently read that the shape of the hole in the headjoint made most of the
difference (this may be common knowledge, but it was news to me). Apparently
oval/round is better for the high range, and oval/square is better for the low
range. (what perfectly round does, I haven't a clue!!) Does Emerson make
different style headjoints? It's worth a shot. Have fun!

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Emerson

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Sat Dec 20, 2003 8:25 am

In reply to what penny said she is an amazing flute player, she
has had 3 different headjoints. Yes she also had the sonare's powell and the
altus but it was much harder to keep in tune and it wasnt worth it so dont go
around seconding anyones opinion because she very professional
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Emerson

Post by Penny » Sat Dec 20, 2003 10:33 am

Second guessing? Altus is a very highly regarded flute maker,
considered among the top handful of companies in the world by people that know
flutes, and if she had problems keeping one in tune she may have a unique
problem. As far as second guessing, there are at least a half dozen major flute
makers that serious flute players choose among as well as countles small flute
and headjoint makers. All those "professional" flute players have different
opinions over what is the best. So are they all second guessing? When people say
they like Chevy better than Ford, they are entitled to their opinion because
they are talking similar products. When they say they like Chevy better than BMW
then they probably don't have sufficient knowledge to make a judgement. Same
thing is true for flutes. You want to compare Emerson v Jupiter v Gemeinhardt,
thats fine. But when you start talking Haynes, Altus, Muramatsu, Myazawa, Powell
you are in a different category. Having listened to play tests of all those
companies as well as several others as well as spoken to over a dozen
professional players including members of symphonies and people that have
repaired them for generations and read of the opinions of hundreds of players
and scientific studies, I "second guess" an opinion of a "professional player"
with no appologies. If a certain "professional player" buys a flute and it
doesn't work out for them, they form an opinion. If they buy one and it sounds
great to their ear they have formed an opinion. Those opinions are based on a
couple of flutes. When one does serious research one forms an opinion based on
hundreds if not thousands of such experiences.

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Emerson

Post by Penny » Sat Dec 20, 2003 10:37 am

As a general rule with quality products you usually trust a
company still under control of its founding family such as Haynes and others I
mentioned over any company that has been involved in corporate take overs and is
basically a for profit business venture instead of a family venture. Emerson,
Armstrong etc have been through the corporate wars and have no or little
connection with the founders. But they do have economies of scale, which helps a
company like Yamaha stay competitive from student to professional level.

User avatar
embum79
Posts: 169
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 11:55 pm

Emerson

Post by embum79 » Sat Dec 20, 2003 3:30 pm

Yes, Jupiter makes tubas, lol. But then, so does Yamaha. These
are things that I personally think about when buying an instrument, but it's
not something that matters to everyone. I like buying from a company that spends
all its time and energy making good flutes. I don't know if this is a bias or
actually good sense. Generally, the way to choose an instrument for yourself is
to play it. You won't know what to do until you try several different
instruments. If you like the DeMedici, compare it to other flutes. Everyone is
going to play and sound a little bit different. When you're looking to step up
to the next level on an instrument, generally you will notice a huge difference
when switching to a better flute. It should feel like you're almost "cheating"
to get a good sound. Good luck with whatever you decide.. remember to take all
our advice with a grain of salt. [;)]
Cheers,
Emily

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Emerson

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Sat Dec 20, 2003 3:41 pm

penny, the only one forming opinions here is you. you decided
that everything is your way and often twist words to the way you want them to
be. Altus headjoints do not tune well with Jupiter diMedici body and footjoints
thats the way it works for two ndividuals ive known. While she has not tried
thousands of flutes (and Im sure you havent either) she tries them on a weekly
basis at the conservatory in boston for students. I believe this would entitle
her to forming an opinion, it is not a fact more of an opinion. Mabye you should
go back and admit some facts of yours are opinions
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

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