Should I go inline or offset G?

Performace Tips, Advanced Technique and More

Moderators: Classitar, pied_piper, Phineas

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

In addition to the donut, there is also a similar insert that is more of a crescent shape. But, I haven't had any experience with it myself.

User avatar
vampav8trix
Posts: 120
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2008 12:03 pm
Location: USA

Post by vampav8trix »

My instructor has the crescent shaped one in her Brannon. It is standard. She says she can't tell the difference. She has an unmodified 1970's Haynes and her new Brannon. Of course she has been playing for over 50 years.

I played her flute. It's awsome, but then again when you pay 10,000+ for a flute, it better be good.

Tarandros
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 3:32 pm
Location: Brighton, England.

Post by Tarandros »

vampav8trix wrote:I used to have a problem with the high E. I got a donut and I hated what it did to the top end of my flute. I took it out. With practice, I got much better at the high E. I just got a new headjoint for my flute and now the E pops out and sings.

You could try getting a different headjoint for your flute. I had one of those old Armstrong 90's. They are not bad, but you might benefit from a modern headjoint.
Thanks for the tip. I'd want to try different headjoints in the future, but one thing is that I got the flute for such a ridiculously low price that a new headjoint is going to cost more than the entire flute did .. So I might try the donut first, if it isn't too expensive, see what happens and then think about a new headjoint depending on the outcome. Regards, T.

Tarandros
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 3:32 pm
Location: Brighton, England.

Post by Tarandros »

fluteguy18 wrote:In addition to the donut, there is also a similar insert that is more of a crescent shape. But, I haven't had any experience with it myself.
Thanks. I think this may be the answer. I imagine that the crescent shaped one has the crescent on the foot side of the hole? Presumably, a donut will tend to flatten the notes above very slightly it if it's circular but less so if it's a crescent shape. I'm interested in what V says about the bad effect on the top notes of the donut.. Obviously, I wouldn't want that happening. Can a donut be removed? If so, I could try it out and if it didn't work, have it taken out again.. Regards, T.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

The donut or crescent can be installed or removed at any time. From what I have seen, is that the crescent is usually installed on the outer edge of the tonehole. Not towards the footjoint or headjoint, but rather towards the left hand pinkie key. But, as a warning, I have seen that the crescents tend to be larger (cover more of the hole) than the donut. BUT, this may just be the ones that I have seen in photos. It is probably dependent on who you go to in order to have it installed.

User avatar
pied_piper
Posts: 1914
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 1:31 pm
Location: Virginia

Post by pied_piper »

Tarandros wrote:I imagine that the crescent shaped one has the crescent on the foot side of the hole? Presumably, a donut will tend to flatten the notes above very slightly it if it's circular but less so if it's a crescent shape.
Not necessarily. Pitch is affected both by the position and the total size (area) of the tone hole opening. Therefore, a large crescent with a small opening could have more of a flattening effect than a small donut with a large opening. Of course the converse is also true.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

Tarandros
Posts: 56
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 3:32 pm
Location: Brighton, England.

Post by Tarandros »

Thanks to all for these various tips about the high E donut. I think I'll go ahead and have one fitted - probably the crescent type. Regards, T.

Post Reply