Suggestions with upgrading to professional flutes

Performace Tips, Advanced Technique and More

Moderators: Classitar, pied_piper, Phineas

sakuramimato
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2004 3:39 am

Post by sakuramimato »

This is a random question, but does anyone know if the Sonare 7000 and Pearl 765 Quantz Coda come with the French case and leather case cover? :shock:

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

I am not sure about the sonare, but the pearl (I beleive) comes in that sort of case. But, the case cover is not leather, it is some sort of waterresistant material. The case cover is pretty much universal throughout all of the pearl line, but the case changes when you get to the elegant and dolce models. These models (and above) all come with solid wood cases (no leather, just polished walnut wood). They are really nice.

fluttiegurl
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Post by fluttiegurl »

Both of the flutes mentioned come with french cases. The Sonare comes with a leather cover, the Pearl comes with a nylon cover. Both have pretty nice cases and covers, but keep in mind that either of these can be replaced fairly inexpensively if you are unhappy with what yours comes with (if you were looking to purchase). The most important thing is whether or not you like how you sound on the flute.

User avatar
woof
Posts: 206
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 8:06 am
Location: North East US

pearl cases

Post by woof »

I have a Pearl Elegante and it does come with a wonderful walnut case and nylon cover- The case if purchase separately is pretty expensive- at least the ones I have seen advertised. Not that a case affects the flute in any way- but it does look great sitting on the table!!!! The other models (600 series) come with a plastic covered case and nylon cover. I have played both the 600 and 700 series Pearls and feel the major difference was the headjoint in the 700 series - otherwise they play pretty similarly- in my opinion. My finger resting on the control rod was odd at first but I don't even notice it now. So far I am very happy with the Pearl.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

NYLON! That was the name of the material I couldnt remember! Yeah, a friend of mine has a really REALLY nice Pearl Cantibile (with all the extras) and it has the walnut case and nylon cover.

Yeah. Thats the word. Nylon.

fluttiegurl
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Post by fluttiegurl »

I played on a Pearl Measta Rose Gold flute for several years, and it had a walnut case. I did not use the cover provided because it did not have a shoulder strap, so I bought one seperately (that I still use). There are a few companies that make special order cases as well, but I can't remember any of them right now :x I hate it when that happens!

My Haynes is in need of a new case, but I secretly like the little Haynes logo imprinted in the inside and don't want to shell out the $ to buy a new Haynes case :wink: This was my dream flute for many years when I could not afford one.

User avatar
Serpentine
Posts: 39
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2006 9:45 am
Location: Wiltshire (UK)

Post by Serpentine »

I just bought a Pearl 718E with a trevor james masters II B foot joint and it is amazing and the footjoint gives a slightly darker sound which i like. The Pearl C foot case was good but i needed a B foot case so got the Miyazawa (sry for incorrect spelling) B foot case which is also the biz!

I love my pearl! :D

nashvilleflute
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:56 pm

try as many as possible

Post by nashvilleflute »

You've got to find the flute that will really work with your sound...I suggest checking out jlsmith flutes...they're a distributor of LOTS of brands and they have a flute buying guide that's free if you request it. Check the link...
http://www.flutesmith.com/
spend more on the front end and you'll be happy later
- remember it's all about the sound - no matter how fast your fingers are...

User avatar
flutepicc06
Posts: 1353
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 11:34 pm

Re: try as many as possible

Post by flutepicc06 »

nashvilleflute wrote:You've got to find the flute that will really work with your sound...I suggest checking out jlsmith flutes...they're a distributor of LOTS of brands and they have a flute buying guide that's free if you request it. Check the link...
http://www.flutesmith.com/
spend more on the front end and you'll be happy later
- remember it's all about the sound - no matter how fast your fingers are...
Good suggestion, Nashvilleflute, but I have to disagree with that last sentence. Sound is a major part of flute playing, and in my opinion the most important part of making music, but if you have no technical capabilities and a beautiful sound, you're not going to get very far. No one is going to pay to hear Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, even if the tone is gorgeous. A healthy balance must be reached between technical and musical aspects of flute playing. For this to happen, the body of the flute matters just as much as the head. A smooth, flowing mech with a so so headjoint or a great head on a flute with a boxy mech will never let you reach your fullest potential. I also don't necessarily agree with the idea of spending more now to be happy later. Admittedly my primary flute was quite expensive, but I'm still happy with a flute I bought for about $1500 as my back up. Repair rate and original cost don't necessarily correlate either. Some of the most expensive flutes are also the most delicate, and likely will need more attention than a sturdily built student flute would.

User avatar
Phineas
Posts: 959
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2005 1:08 am

Post by Phineas »

Good suggestion, Nashvilleflute, but I have to disagree with that last sentence. Sound is a major part of flute playing, and in my opinion the most important part of making music, but if you have no technical capabilities and a beautiful sound, you're not going to get very far. No one is going to pay to hear Twinkle Twinkle Little Star, even if the tone is gorgeous. A healthy balance must be reached between technical and musical aspects of flute playing. For this to happen, the body of the flute matters just as much as the head. A smooth, flowing mech with a so so headjoint or a great head on a flute with a boxy mech will never let you reach your fullest potential. I also don't necessarily agree with the idea of spending more now to be happy later. Admittedly my primary flute was quite expensive, but I'm still happy with a flute I bought for about $1500 as my back up. Repair rate and original cost don't necessarily correlate either. Some of the most expensive flutes are also the most delicate, and likely will need more attention than a sturdily built student flute would.
I agree with you Chris, for the most part. "Twinkle Twinkle Litte Star" is kind of the extreme end of what I think Nashivilleflute was trying to say. However, if you are playing for children, that song may go over like a smash hit! On the average, sound, and how familiar the audience is with the song/tune/piece goes a lot farther than technical ability. You can be the greatest musician in the world, but unless the audience is full of musicians, you better play the right song, and it better sound good. I cannot tell you how many times I have lost auditions against people that were "ok" players just because they knew the right songs.

Phineas

fluttiegurl
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Post by fluttiegurl »

On the other side of what Nashvilleflute may have been saying, when comparing several flutes that you like the feel of, the sound is the most important thing. I have played many flutes with very fluid key action, but really did not produce the sound that I wanted. Though I do agree that a nice sounding flute that has poor movement is not a good choice, I can see where Nashvilleflute may have been heading. The impression that people get from you is how you sound. If you are unable to play notes or you are struggling to play the flute because of the key action, it will show. Especially in major auditions and concerts. I have a student that came to me recently from another teacher who can play anything technical that you put in front of her. However, her tone is very lacking. No matter how hard she has tried, even when she nailed the notes, she has never passed an audition. With only a few days of tone exercizes, she is improving. With some work, her tone will eventually match her technique. It has nothing whatsoever to do with the flute that she is playing at the moment.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

Yeah, I agree with the previous comment about if you like the feel of several instruments, then go with the flute that gives you the best sound. I recently compared a miyazawa and a pearl. I liked the feel of both of them, but I liked my sound on the pearl the best. For me, the miyazawa, although an amazing flute, just sounded too much like the flute I play now, which although it doesnt a bad sound, it just wasnt what I was looking for.

So, I agree. If you like the feel of several, go with the one that you like the sound the best.

flutegeek1992
Posts: 70
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2006 7:17 pm
Location: Ohio
Contact:

Post by flutegeek1992 »

I am also looking to upgrade from my germeinhardt. I was recommended a Pearl 765 Quantz Coda. I can tell you that I absolutly love this flute! However, it might not be your favorite. I get that wonderful rich tone and the key motion is great for me.

dprflute
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2006 3:17 pm

Post by dprflute »

hi,
I have just taken up the flute again about three years ago after many years (decades) and am now looking to upgrade.
i would appreciate any feedback on the powell signature flute. how does it differ from the powell conservatory silver model? How does it compare for example to a yamaha 784 or Pearl Elegant. 795 model? And how does the powell conservatory silver flute compare to the haynes classic (drawn tone holes) model? thanks for your feedback!

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

I dont know the specifics, but really, it is difficult to compare the qualities between several different flutes to someone else. Everyone has their own playing styles, and preferences when it comes to flutes. In my opinion, it would be best for you to just try them all out, and decide for yourself how they compare.

Post Reply