Shakuhachi, a bamboo flute

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Heirii
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Shakuhachi, a bamboo flute

Post by Heirii »

The Shakuhachi is a bamboo flute, originated in Japan and thus mostly played in Japan. It is a lovely instrument.... I heard it for the first time in some background music on TV and I said WHAT WAS THAT? Because it most definitely sounded like a flute... but a screeching, agonized flute. Well I bought a CD in which it duets with koto, and I'm almost sure that I want to be able to play it one day, when I gather enough funds to spend on one. Has anyone ever played this instrument? Would you consider it to be a lesson based instrument, or do you think one could get the hang of it just by teaching themselves? At least, I taught myself how to play the flute, and I'm wondering if would be as easy with the shakuhachi to begin with... and I was wondering how common it was amongst flute players or just players in general, and if there were people out there in the U.S. that actually give lessons.

I just love the sound of this instrument... I have an obsessive need to talk about it xD

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flutepower
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Post by flutepower »

Hey,

I am teaching myself to play the flute to!!!
I've began a little less then 6 months ago.
Thats all I can say
~Melissa
ps: I'm going 2 camp 2morrow!

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Bo
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Post by Bo »

I would like to add it to my collection too... It sounds lovely.

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

First of all, here is a fellow that makes Shakuhachii in different keys.

http://www.eriktheflutemaker.com/

I started on on Bamboo flutes. All I can do is tell you to look on youtube and search for videos that demonstrate how to play the Shakuhachi. It is more technique than anything.

Phineas

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 »

I have one of Erik's Concert (low) D flutes. It's great. I had to do some tweaking to it though. Where he tuned it, it left some rough surfaces on the inside of the holes (finger and embouchure) so I went in and smoothed them out with an exacto knife. It played WAY better afterwards (and it played well to start with).

If you want to get a start with wood flutes, his are a good place to start.

Heirii
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Location: Mississippi

Post by Heirii »

Thanks for the link :D Erik makes such beautiful-looking flutes.

I definitely want the end blown Shakuhachi in Concert D. But it'll have to wait :/ I'm saving up for a Miyazawa. My ancient Gemeindhardt is killing me.

It's great to know that there are others here who know of the Shakuhachi itself, haha...
A lack of professionalism makes room for creativity. That's my excuse >.>

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JButky
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Re: Shakuhachi, a bamboo flute

Post by JButky »

Heirii wrote: I just love the sound of this instrument... I have an obsessive need to talk about it xD
I play a little. Marco Leinhard is one of my favorites. East Winds Ensemble has some great music from Miyazaki classics. The ensemble's rendition of Princess Mononoke is perhaps my favorite. Marco's playing is just fabulous.

You can find him on CD baby and find an MP3 snippet of Mononoke Hime. If you have a rhapsody account, you can listen to the whole thing.
Joe B

Heirii
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Joined: Wed Jun 23, 2010 8:12 pm
Location: Mississippi

Re: Shakuhachi, a bamboo flute

Post by Heirii »

JButky wrote:
Heirii wrote: I just love the sound of this instrument... I have an obsessive need to talk about it xD
I play a little. Marco Leinhard is one of my favorites. East Winds Ensemble has some great music from Miyazaki classics. The ensemble's rendition of Princess Mononoke is perhaps my favorite. Marco's playing is just fabulous.

You can find him on CD baby and find an MP3 snippet of Mononoke Hime. If you have a rhapsody account, you can listen to the whole thing.
Thanks for the suggestion =D I'll have to look into it.

I wonder, if you really wanted to master this instrument, should you go to Japan from where it originated? Just a curious thought.
A lack of professionalism makes room for creativity. That's my excuse >.>

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Bo
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Re: Shakuhachi, a bamboo flute

Post by Bo »

Heirii wrote: I wonder, if you really wanted to master this instrument, should you go to Japan from where it originated? Just a curious thought.
Wouldn't a good Japanese teacher be enough?
It would certainly be exciting to go to Japan though... 8)

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Bo
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Post by Bo »

I am surprised!
I just bought an encyclopaedia of musical instruments, and it says the shakuhachi actually originated in China and was taken to Japan by Buddhist priests in 935...

Heirii
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Post by Heirii »

Bo wrote:Wouldn't a good Japanese teacher be enough?
It would certainly be exciting to go to Japan though...
Yes, but here in the United States... at least, from what I know, I think it would be difficult to find anyone of pure ethnicity. And I'm always looking for a reason to go to Japan anyway, haha.
Bo wrote:I am surprised!
I just bought an encyclopaedia of musical instruments, and it says the shakuhachi actually originated in China and was taken to Japan by Buddhist priests in 935...
I'm not surprised :P A lot of things in Japan originated from China, like the so-famous ramen. (Or at least, it's popular where I live D:) But the name "shakuhachi" is Japanese, so it was really publicized there in Japan. As much as I would like to talk more about Japan and its culture... I should probably not because it go way off topic of flutes... because besides playing the flute, Japan is my most favorite subject :D
A lack of professionalism makes room for creativity. That's my excuse >.>

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