Question about Pearls

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fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 »

c_otter wrote:I found that magical quality with a Williams flute... sigh

At least I sound better on the silver than the gold flutes.
Yes.... I tried a williams flute [just for the heck of it, because it was outside my budget] and it wore the pricetag of $37,000 14k gold tubing and mech. with a platinum headjoint, with all the extra gadgets available.... :shock: Then.... it turns out that I didnt like it whatsoever. :lol:

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

I have students who play Pearl Quantz flutes with and without the CODA. I personally do not think it is worth the money, but again, I have students who have made the extra investment. What I have found is that the CODA does add a little more weight to the flute, I assume sue to the C# trill key.
Interesting. There is not that much of a difference between the Quantz and the Quantz Coda. I own a Quantz 665, and one the best playing, sounding and most versatile instrument I have, and I own a Miyazawa Legacy 1E and a 500 series Yamaha.

Oh well to each their own.

Phineas

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woof
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Pearls

Post by woof »

I play a Pearl Elegante and really like the flute. It plays easily, is very much in tune from C1- C4- based on my electronic tuner (this makes it easy to play along with music on CDs). The cut of the headjoint is interesting and very responsive- a bit like driving a ferrai (I assume) it is easy to overblow so you must have control but you get paid back in very lively response. I also find that it is easy to add "color" variation to my playing. The upper register are very easy to play up through C4, I still have some difficulty with C1 B1. But each player is different. I do recommend home trial if possible and if possible to try several different flutes at the same time over a week trial period. This gives you a real chance to get to know the flute and hear the subtle differences. Also to play in rooms with different acoustics. That does affect the sound you hear when you play.

sakuramimato
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Post by sakuramimato »

Some more questions!

Are there differences [mostly quality] between a Japanese-made Pearl to one that was made in the United States? Or are they all made in Japan?

I noticed that they don't offer the Quantz series on their Japanese site, but I'm guessing their numbering system is just a little different from the US/English site.

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl »

As far as I know, no Pearl flutes are currently made in the US. Some are made in Taiwan (I believe Quantz and below). In the past, flutes made in Taiwan were not too great, but I believe they have improved very much in the past several years.
However, I took a student's flute in for service today (a Pearl 665), and the tech told me that they keys were bent pretty bad. This students is very cautious with her flute, maybe overly so, and I do not believe that she has abused the flute in any way. She just plays constantly (several hours each night after school and more on the weekends). Me tech said that this was something that he saw a lot from these flutes (the Quantz) and believes it is due to the metal used. With that said, this is the first major problem that I have personally run into. I still believe that for some students, Pearls are wonderful.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 »

I too have heard things about the keys on Pearls [ the intermediate models and below] having problems with bending keys. I have even heard the mechanism as being described as a soft mech. But, I still stand by my opinion that they are good flutes, and that for some people they are absolutely wonderful.

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

As an owner of a Quantz 665, and a 501e I can confirm a couple of things.

1. On the student model (501e), I have had to get more adjustments due to the durability of the keys. I have not had this issue on the Quantz 665.

2. These flutes are made in Taiwan. However, the japanese presence in Taiwan ensures a much higher quality than we see with thing made in China. Yamaha manufactures alot of instruments there. After visiting a few music instrument factories in Taiwan, I am convinced that some of the best instruments in the world are made there. Especially thier stringed instruments!

3. I played on my Pearl 665 all over Asia, over the last year, playing gigs up to 5 times a week, and I have not needed any adjustments.(Although it is about time for a checkup!)

Bottom line is, Pearl flutes are good instruments. You may be able to find "better" instruments. Not every instrument is good for everyone.

Phineas

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl »

Many people would be amazed at how many instruments are made in Taiwan. Some of the prominant flutes on the market are actually made there and sent to the US (or other countries) for "fine tuning" and logo stamping. I know of three made to different specs in the same factory for three US manufacturers. Overall, it is quality management that makes the difference. Because of this trend, higher end flutes are more readily available and affordable to the general public. Even though the past has indicated differently, this is a good thing for musicians (not just flutists) all over the world.

deina-kun
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Post by deina-kun »

The 505.. what metal is it made out of? Plated silver all the way through including the headjoint?

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

http://www.pearlflutes.com/html/quantz_505.html

The body and headjoint are silver plated.

Phineas

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woof
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Post by woof »

fluttiegurl wrote: However, I took a student's flute in for service today (a Pearl 665), and the tech told me that they keys were bent pretty bad. .
What is meant by a bent key? What part of the key bends? I can't imagine the force it might take to bend a key since it moves only a short distance and rest squarely on the hole- of course a dropped flute might certainly accomplish the task. I could see damage to the pads from to much force. Do you mean bent rods? The one key that seems most vulnerable would the b natural and flat keys since those keys are longer.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 »

woof wrote:
fluttiegurl wrote: However, I took a student's flute in for service today (a Pearl 665), and the tech told me that they keys were bent pretty bad. .
What is meant by a bent key? What part of the key bends? I can't imagine the force it might take to bend a key since it moves only a short distance and rest squarely on the hole- of course a dropped flute might certainly accomplish the task. I could see damage to the pads from to much force. Do you mean bent rods? The one key that seems most vulnerable would the b natural and flat keys since those keys are longer.
It actually takes surprisingly little force to bend a key. I've done it to repair flutes before, and your bare hands can certainly accomplish the task. In fact, when working on a flute without a Split E, it is pretty common to slightly bend the G keys so that you can pad both accurately without the other key getting in the way, and then to bend them back so they both close simultaneously once you have the pads seated properly.There are different ways to bend different parts of the keys as necessary, but the arms can bend or flex, as can the cup itself, quite apart from the rods.

deina-kun
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Post by deina-kun »

Has anyone heard anything about the Dolce? I've heard about people either loving or hating the 665/765 Quantz, but nothing much from the Dolce and Elegants. How is its quality against a Quantz CODA?

I'm looking into one, but it seems it's just like the Quantz 665 version in comparison to the Elegante since it has a solid silver headjoint with a plated body and footjoint rather than all silver.

Also, what are the differences between Pearl PH-7 and PH-7J headjoints?

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 »

I believe [but am not positive] that the Elegante and Dolce models are the first level of handmade models that Pearl offers [based off of pricing, specs and the fact that the model name is engraved on the barrel rather than a model# which is something they do on their handmade instruments].

Other than that, I cant help you. I havent tried those two headjoints.

I met someone at a convention recently who just purchased an Elegante, and absolutely loved it.

But basically, I think that the elegante and dolce flutes are handmade, and the Quantz is machine made.

But, I am not certain about this.

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl »

Sorry for slow response. I have been out of town with orchestra.

woof, I actually did mean a bent key. As flutepicc06 said, it does not take that much force to bend a key. However, this seems to happen more frequently on certain flutes than others. Does that make a difference? Maybe for a students who uses a great deal of pressure or does not take care of the flute (certainly not the cases with any of my students).

deina-kun, fluteguy18 is right, the Quantz is factory made and the Dolce is the entry level handmade, or at least that was the case in the past. These flutes are made in different factories. I have played the Dolce and the Elegante side by side, and they are very similar. I also played them against a Quantz, and I could tell the difference in quality between these two flutes. I would highly recommend trying them side by side if you are choosing between the two. Don't get hung up on the impressive options of the Quantz Coda flutes. It is really quite different from the Dolce in response and feel (in my opinion). As for the headjoints, I have no idea what the difference is. It seems like in the dark recesses of my mind I did know at one time, but I can't recall. I will post if I remember.

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