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Di Zhao flutes

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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Wicked Good
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Location: New Hampshire

Di Zhao flutes

Postby Wicked Good » Tue Aug 04, 2009 6:38 pm

Hello,

I've been a lurker, and now first-time poster on this board. My background is as a professional/semi-professional clarinetist/saxophonist, and just this January started back on flute after a nearly 20-year layoff from that instrument.

My question is: has anyone here yet tried Di Zhao's flutes? My understanding is that they are another, China-based, intermediate flute company.

I've got one that I'm borrowing now, and so far I like it quite a bit. However, my only references are my 1970s Gemmy M3, and my friend's old Haynes Commercial. The Zhao plays rings around both, but as of yet I don't know much about the company.

Any insights are appreciated, thanks.
WG

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Tarandros
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Re: Di Zhao flutes

Postby Tarandros » Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:11 pm

Hello,

I've been a lurker, and now first-time poster on this board. My background is as a professional/semi-professional clarinetist/saxophonist, and just this January started back on flute after a nearly 20-year layoff from that instrument.

My question is: has anyone here yet tried Di Zhao's flutes? My understanding is that they are another, China-based, intermediate flute company.

I've got one that I'm borrowing now, and so far I like it quite a bit. However, my only references are my 1970s Gemmy M3, and my friend's old Haynes Commercial. The Zhao plays rings around both, but as of yet I don't know much about the company.

Any insights are appreciated, thanks.
WG
Can't say I've tried them and I'd never heard of them before your message. From the website though, it looks like the two Directors/Partners have an impressive pedigree in both flute performance and construction, including stints at Haynes and Powell:

http://www.dizhaoflutes.com/aboutus.php

The price list looks very reasonable. Which type are you borrowing - one of the silver plated models with or without silver headjoint or one of the silver ones? They also do a Grenadilla one at a very reasonable price. I'm sure a lot of us here would be interested to find out how you get on with the flute in the longer term. Regards, T.

Wicked Good
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Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2009 7:20 pm
Location: New Hampshire

Postby Wicked Good » Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:30 pm

Can't say I've tried them and I'd never heard of them before your message. From the website though, it looks like the two Directors/Partners have an impressive pedigree in both flute performance and construction, including stints at Haynes and Powell:

http://www.dizhaoflutes.com/aboutus.php

The price list looks very reasonable. Which type are you borrowing - one of the silver plated models with or without silver headjoint or one of the silver ones? They also do a Grenadilla one at a very reasonable price. I'm sure a lot of us here would be interested to find out how you get on with the flute in the longer term. Regards, T.
Thanks for your reply. I'm borrowing a DZ-601: silver headjoint & body, plated keys, pointed arms, B footjoint, offset G, with C# trill key.

The flute seems quite well made, and my teacher likes it a lot, too. It's got a huge sound and a great scale. It's still early, but I've not yet found anything to nitpick about this flute. As you say, how I get along with it in the longer term is more interesting.

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Tarandros
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Postby Tarandros » Tue Aug 04, 2009 7:55 pm

From what you've said so far, the flute seems very good value for money. The longer term concern is obviously how durable the mechanism is, but it seems, so far so good. Regards, T.

fluteguy18
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Postby fluteguy18 » Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:53 pm

If you like it, I would say this is probably a pretty good deal. I mean, if one of the owners had a 15 year career at Powell, then he must have a fairly good amount of skill at making a flute, and high standards to match. If the mechanism turns out to be dodgy in the long run, if worse came to worse you could have the mechanism rebuilt or replaced, or perhaps get a new flute entirely.

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Tarandros
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Postby Tarandros » Thu Aug 06, 2009 6:14 pm

How long have you been borrowing this flute for, and how long did the owner play it before lending it to you? I agree with fluteguy18 but also, if say, the person who lent it to you played it for six months and you've been playing it for say three months and there aren't any problems yet, then it's probably going to be reliable. An indication of these time periods could help in assessing the durability question, in other words. Regards, T.

Wicked Good
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Location: New Hampshire

Postby Wicked Good » Fri Aug 07, 2009 8:19 am

I honestly don't know how long she's had it. I've only been borrowing it for a couple of weeks. It will take several months of steady playing before I can make a reasonable assumption of durability and overall quality.

My questions have pretty much been answered, I think. This is a pretty new company with little or no track record, but the principals involved have extensive experience with producing high quality flutes. They appear to be in direct competition with Sonare, Azumi, et al (if I understand those companies' products correctly).

Based upon the owner's comments (she loves it), and my own limited but quite positive experience with the DZ-601, I have to give it big thumbs-up for the time being. Time will tell.

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Tarandros
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Postby Tarandros » Sat Aug 08, 2009 3:33 am

Wicked Good: they certainly seem to be very good instruments on all the available indications. Maybe now's the time to buy one - before their reputation gets around and the price goes up? Kind regards, T.

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Zevang
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Postby Zevang » Tue Aug 11, 2009 2:12 pm

Hi all.
It's now pretty late to post something regarding this subject but (coincidence or not...) I've just had contact with a DiZhao flute, brought by a flutist friend who is now representing this brand.
Seemed to me a very good studend flute, easy blowing, and nice tone.
Also, my friend told me those flutes are manufactured in China, under direct supervision of Mr Zhao (who acctually lives in the USA), and completely revised since they arrive at the USA. He told me also that Mr Zhao is very serious about his reputation. My friend saw him simply destroying a flute that did not match Mr.Zhao's expectations, and also was present when he just made a call to China and simply yelled to his employees about this.

I agree with Tarandros that reputation is something we build with time. DiZhao is unknown, but following the path he is riding, it will sure be a big company in the future. The price is just unbelievable, for now...

Oh! I forgot to mention that Mr.Zhao also manufacture wooden flutes. My friend ordered one but I really couldn't tell about it so far.

Wicked Good
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Location: New Hampshire

Postby Wicked Good » Wed Aug 12, 2009 8:12 pm

Well, after all the playing and testing, I broke down and bought a Di Zhao DZ-601 just like my friend's, but without a split E mechanism.

I really like these flutes. I think that the Di Zhao is a good balance of fine craftsmanship, outstanding playability, and value.

All I know is, because it's such a joy to play, my flute practice time has increased! My clarinets are getting jealous.

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Tarandros
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Postby Tarandros » Fri Aug 14, 2009 7:00 pm


All I know is, because it's such a joy to play, my flute practice time has increased! My clarinets are getting jealous.
That's the test. Congratulations. If you enjoy playing it, then what better reason to buy it? Kind regards, T.

Wicked Good
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Location: New Hampshire

Several months along with the DZ-601 ...

Postby Wicked Good » Tue Dec 15, 2009 9:03 pm

... and the flute's holding up excellently. It's really a sturdy instrument, and the build quality is great. I enjoy playing it just as much now as when it was brand new.

The intonation really is key; it's spot on, with a lovely, resonant sound in all ranges. It blends easily with other flutes, and is no slouch as a solo flute, either.

So all in all, I'd say that if the majority of Di Zhao's flutes are like mine, then they are every bit as good as other intermediate flutes out there. Now to try the piccolos .... 8)

wally
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Postby wally » Sat Jan 23, 2010 12:48 pm

I've been curious about this brand ever since pairing an aftermarket Powell Signature headjoint to my student Yamaha. I was told that Mr. Zhao was the flutesmith that did the cut on that headjoint, though I can't know for certain of course.

DiZhao flutes include a plateau model with C-foot, exactly what I like now*, but I'm wondering if it will be better-built than the Yamaha I currently have. I'm also wondering what scale the DZs are based on. Bennett?

Wicked Good
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Postby Wicked Good » Sat Apr 10, 2010 1:23 pm

Sorry, haven't been around in quite awhile. I'm not a flute scale expert by any means - I'm a clarinetist - but my flute instructor indicated that the Di Zhao was built around a Cooper scale. I have no reason to doubt her.

WalterMitty
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Postby WalterMitty » Sat Apr 10, 2010 5:10 pm

I had an occasion to touch and play a bit wooden flute of him, and it was nice.

It's owned by a professional flutist and she said all good things about the flute and him.

The keys (open hole) were very light and nice (and thin). The fingers just fit so well on them, a bit like my Yamaha hand made professional model (but possibly even more).

Highly attractive flute (including the price).


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