Di Zhao Quality Question

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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fred2
Posts: 3
Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:33 pm

Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by fred2 » Sat Mar 19, 2011 11:56 am

I’m considering the purchase of a Di Zhao 700 and was wondering if anyone has used one for a year or so, and how it was holding up?

I’ve been playing for about a year, and would like to by a flute that would last 10 years, playing 1 – 2 hours per day.

I’m also considering:
Muramatsu EX
Gemeinhardt 33
Azumi 3000
Sonare 600 series
Yamaha 500-600

The Di Zhao seems relatively new to the market - Any advice?

fluttiegurl
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by fluttiegurl » Sat Mar 19, 2011 4:33 pm

The first thing that you should be aware of is the fact that the flutes you have listed, though they have the same basic features, are a very wide range of instruments. The second thing I would point out is that asking most of these flutes to last 10 years is a stretch. Most likely, if the flute does not wear out (though regular maintenance will help), you will change in your playing so much that the flute will not longer fit your needs/wants.

As for DiZhao, I did try some of these back in January and they were pretty standard, well made (as far as I could tell) flutes. As for how well they will last, only time will tell.

My suggestion would be to do a great deal of research before selecting any of these flutes, or any flute for that matter. I am not saying any of them are not good flutes (the Muramatsu EX is one of my personal favs), but you need to be aware of the individual makers, not just the basic specs of the instruments. For instance, Sonare and Azumi are both flutes that are considered "hybrid" flutes with decent headjoints on cheaper bodies. While they do play well for some, from my experiences, the bodies do not hold up well. Muramatsus were at one time all handmade (not sure if this is still the case) which puts them in a completely different category altogether. Personally (this is just my personal opinion), the Gemeinhardt is pretty much a souped up student flute, though I am not 100% sure which model flute you are referring to.I have only owned one Gemeinhardt (a KGM Standard) that I would have considered a worthy instrument for long time use. I have one student who plays a Yamaha 674 and she loves it. It seems to be a good flute that will last a long time, but she will most likely upgrade again in the near future as she plans to study music in college and graduate school. As you can see, all of these flutes have their own pros and cons, and generate a LOT of opinions!

My advice is to try out as many flutes as you can, being completely realistic that the flute you buy this year may or may not last you a life time. Depending on your flute goals, be prepared to upgrade again at some point, and in the mean time, love whatever you end up buying. If you are a hobbyist, get the most flute you can for the cash. We all have opinions on what that would be, but it will be up to you to decide what you like.

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Zevang
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Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by Zevang » Sat Mar 19, 2011 4:38 pm

Couldn't agree more. Well said, excelent advise.

fred2
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Joined: Fri Mar 18, 2011 7:33 pm

Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by fred2 » Sun Mar 20, 2011 12:23 pm

Fluttiegurl-
Thank you for your advice - makes great sense!
I guess part of my problem is that I’m not sure how far I well progress in my flute playing abilities, and resulting flute requirements/desires. I’m 59 years old, been playing for a year, and have a great instructor. I guess only time will tell! Maybe the Muramatsus and later update the headjoint, if I ever memorize these scales. :D

concertmaster3
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Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by concertmaster3 » Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:37 pm

I play a DiZhao 700 (with C# trill, D# roller and split E)

It's a great flute, and had a few flute choir members play on it, and they said it was great too. I'm really enjoying it, and used it at my grad school auditions (multiple woodwinds). It's got a great tone and scale, good projection, and I actually prefer it to the Altus 807 (or 907?) that I was borrowing before. I tried a different one while I was in NY, and also thought highly of it.

I'm not sure of the longevity of it, as I've only had it a month or 2, but it seems pretty solid to me.
Ronnal Ford
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ruthazuz
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Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:47 pm

Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by ruthazuz » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:58 pm

My Haynes Amadeus flute was stolen from my house the other night. :evil: I need to replace it urgently, so I looked on the internet for possibilities. I found something about the DiZhao 601 flute that I can get here in Jerusalem for about $1,200. I need a professional level, but the comments on this board sound positive. :) I wonder if I can close the open holes, though, since I don't like playing with open holes. Anyone tried closing open holes with silicone or some other material?

fluttiegurl
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Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by fluttiegurl » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:26 pm

They sell plugs for that purpose. Also, many flutes come with plugs. Ask when you purchase the flute.

ruthazuz
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:47 pm

Re: Di Zhao Quality Question

Post by ruthazuz » Thu Feb 14, 2013 2:05 pm

Thank you! I did speak to the person selling the flute this morning, and he said there were plugs. I will be going to look at the flute on Sunday. :?

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