split e

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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krzymunkey
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2003 2:54 pm

split e

Post by krzymunkey » Thu Dec 25, 2003 5:41 pm

'
Dream
as if you'll live forever... Live as if you'll die tomorrow...

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

split e

Post by MattMom » Fri Dec 26, 2003 12:40 pm

From what I read, Mechanically it is far easier to build the
split E mech on an offset G. It can be done on an inline flute, but you have to
pay for that as an option, and as you know, not all manufacturers offer it. If
you really want a split E, is there a reason why you're staying away from the
offset G? Offsets are getting some really good press lately, both from an
ergonomic perspective, and a mechanical one. Hey, how did the ebay purchase go?
If you're still in the market, it sounds like you decided against it.

AG950Flute
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 4:24 pm

split e

Post by AG950Flute » Fri Dec 26, 2003 1:00 pm

that's right about the mechanics of a split e on an inline
flute. what happens is that the keys in the left hand begin to bind and you have
a lot more trouble keeping the flute in working condition. what some of the
higher end flute makers do to accomodate for those who wish to have a split e on
an inline flute is to make the left hand mechanism into a "pinless" mechanism.
(most flutes have a pinned mechanism. the pins are the little pieces of metal
that stick out slightly from the rods that hold the keys.) anyway, hope that
helps.
Courtney
Morton

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

split e

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Fri Dec 26, 2003 4:08 pm

whats a split e?
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

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krzymunkey
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2003 2:54 pm

split e

Post by krzymunkey » Sat Dec 27, 2003 2:14 pm

i was just wondering, i'm not against offset g; either one is
fine, but the flutes i've seen are mostly inline (without split E), and i
probably will not have a choice of inline/offset, cuz im probably going to get a
flute off ebay or something.. oh, the ebay purchase was not successful (not
because of the bidding, there is BUY IT NOW) but because my mom thought it was
too expensive.. thanks Split E: go to this site
http://www.hammig.com/articles/other1.htm [:bigsmile:]
Dream
as if you'll live forever... Live as if you'll die tomorrow...

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

split e

Post by Penny » Sat Dec 27, 2003 3:04 pm

split e can be purchased on many inline flutes but it is rarely
found and often a special order. Inline is inferrior for many resons,
ergonomically, mechanically and quality of play, most of which have been
discussed here on different threads as well as in books and other discussion
groups. This is an explanation of split e from Trevor James website The note E3
has always been difficult to play in tune (it has a tendency to be sharp) as
well as crack easily when first attacked. The split E mechanism is an optional
extra and can be requested on both in-line and off-set G flutes, however the E
mechanism is most commonly found on the offset G flute. When a player plays E3
on a flute without an E mechanism, both G keys remain open. However if the
player has an E mechanism, a bar located adjacent to the F# key pushes down the
lower G key. The upper G key however remains open. Don't give up on quality by
settling for an inline flute. Because so many players are switching to offset,
there is a bigger, cheaper supply of inline. But the difference in price isn't
that great for your long term good. Split e mechs usually come at a premium.
Sometimes that premium is minimal and sometimes prohibitive.

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

split e

Post by MattMom » Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:37 pm

[quote] ---------------- On 12/27/2003 2:14:19 PM oh, the ebay
purchase was not successful (not because of the bidding, there is BUY IT NOW)
but because my mom thought it was too expensive.. thanks ----------------
[/quote] Are you having mechanical problems with your current flute, or are you
looking for better sound? If it's the latter, you may be able to get what you
want by upgrading the headjoint. It's amazing what that can do. I >have< seen
headjoints for sale on ebay, but you never know how they will sound on your
particular flute. On the other hand, if you are looking for other things in the
body (b foot, etc), you may have to work out a deal with your mom. One of the
things I'm doing with my daughters (and myself as well), is logging playing
time. This includes practices and performances. Every hour will be worth a
certain dollar amount, which will be deposited in an account ONLY for use on
instrument purchases. Basically, the point is, that if you play a lot, then you
deserve a better instrument, but it also gives you a way to save towards it.

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krzymunkey
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2003 2:54 pm

split e

Post by krzymunkey » Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:55 pm

i'm looking for the other stuff too, not only a better sound,
my teacher says i should get a new flute, (b foot, open holes..) the practice
log thing isn't the case with me. my mom wants to get a flute for me, but we
have some financial problems, so i can't get a flute YET.. but i will get one
before memorial day (in may) because i am going on tour to carnegie hall, and i
need a better flute [:bigsmile:] [:((]
Dream
as if you'll live forever... Live as if you'll die tomorrow...

AG950Flute
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 4:24 pm

split e

Post by AG950Flute » Sun Dec 28, 2003 2:29 pm

also in regards to having a split e... it does change the
timbre of the 3rd octave E. I personally don't like it, others don't mind it.
there's other solutions as well that don't change the timbre of the sound on
that note but provide the same kind of stability and it's also much cheaper
than a split e. look into having a "donut" inserted into the lower g key, which
can be done after you purchase your flute or depending on what kind of
instrument you get you may be able to have them put one in for you.
Courtney
Morton

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