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Artley flute

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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reygbautista
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Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2011 6:31 am

Re: Artley flute

Postby reygbautista » Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:31 am

you can have an idea of the market value at ebay.
i got my wilkins model, b foot, at ebay.

jcleaver84
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Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:41 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby jcleaver84 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:50 pm

Anyone have any information on an Artley Model 6-0. Serial number (399903) indicates it was made in 1974. It is stamped with the Nogales address on the head stamp as well as having the word silver stamped on all 3 pieces. I have not been able to find out any information on this model Artley. Any information would be appreciated.

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:12 pm

I previously posted some info about various Artley models that I have found information about, but 6-0 was not one of them. See this link:
http://www.fluteland.com/board/viewtopi ... del#p26822

Does your flute have open holes (French) or closed holes (plateau) keys?

Is it possible you have an Artley Wilkins 36-0 Those had all silver head, body, and foot.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

jcleaver84
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Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2013 3:41 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby jcleaver84 » Wed Jan 16, 2013 7:09 am

Thanks for reply Piper. The flute has closed holes. Nothing on the flute says Wilkins. Another bit of info I neglected to mention before is the it is a B Foot.

KSCanfield
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Joined: Mon Mar 04, 2013 12:44 am

Re: Artley flute

Postby KSCanfield » Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:23 am

My aunt, who lives in a retirement home, let me take her flute which she no longer plans on trying to play again, with the idea that I would find a good home for it (and give her the money when and if I sell it, which wasn't mentioned but is certainly what I intend). However, although a longtime musician with what I like to think is a good ear, I have no clue about flutes. So although I have read most of the posts here about Artleys, I really don't know what I have (e.g., no idea what a C- or B-foot is, or whether it's a Wilkins or a Powell). What I do see is that it is a Symphony, made in Elkhart, the lettering inline with the body. Nowhere on it does it say "Silver" (or any other metal), although there happens to be a 3M "Silver Protector Strip" in the case, and it certainly looks (from what corrosion there is) as though it's silver-plated. What also throws me a bit, after poking around the web trying to find out about serial numbers, is that either there is none, or else the serial number is the same *four* digits -- beginning with "9" -- stamped near one end of each of the three sections of the instrument. I have no illusions about having some mysterious magical masterpiece of musical manufacture, and assume it's a student model, but is there any way I can find out more from looking at it, *before* I take it into a shop and have somebody look it over (and tell me they'll give me a quarter of what I later find out it's really worth)?

Cheers!

Kerry in Portland, Oregon

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Mon Mar 04, 2013 9:58 pm

If your aunt's flute has a 4 digit serial number starting with 9, (i.e. 9xxx) it would have been made around 1951 or 1952. See the serial number list here: http://www.musictrader.com/artley.html

There were a couple of variations on the Artley Symphony flute. Some had a silver headjoint, some had a silver plated headjoint, all of them had silver plated body and keys. If it's not marked silver, it is plated. All that I have seen have a C foot.

I have a slightly newer Artley Symphony (1960s era) that I bought on eBay a few years ago and I paid $20 for it. Unless it is in pristine, like-new condition, it is probably not worth a lot more. The Artley Symphony is not a bad flute. In good condition, they play OK but not great - good for a beginner. Unfortunately, there are a lot of old Artley flutes out there and they are not in high demand so the prices remain fairly low.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

KSCanfield
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Re: Artley flute

Postby KSCanfield » Tue Mar 05, 2013 12:34 am

Thanks for the info. I wondered about the number; it's odd that no list I've found starts with any number lower that 10,000, since the company was started in the '30s. As for the possible value, I can't say I'm surprised or disappointed. One of my bandmates played it a bit tonight and did say the pads are actually in good condition, so it's playable. Interestingly enough, he also told me it had a B foot. Needs cleaning I'm sure, and needs polishing, too. Beyond that ...?

tfjjmc
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Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2013 9:48 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby tfjjmc » Wed Aug 28, 2013 10:40 pm

I have an Artley 5-0B (Open hole, silver thin wall head joint, and B flat foot) that I purchased new in 1995. At the time I purchased it I was also offered the identical Armstrong Flute for the same price. Everything was the same even the case they came in. When I inquired what the difference was I was told it was the exact same thing manufactured by the same company. Since I already had an Artley Piccolo and the case had a place for the Piccolo I went with the Artley over the Armstrong. My Flute also has the Armstrong style A engraved on the head joint. I never noticed that the A on the head joint is not the same A that is used in the Artley logo. The flute has served me well over the years and has a nice tone and is still in near mint condition.

I also still have all my original paperwork that came with the Flute. All of the documentation states Conn-Artley, C.G. CONN, Elkhart, Indiana. When reading through the warranty paperwork it states: Artley Woodwind instruments are manufactured by United Musical Instruments, U.S.A. Inc. P. O. Box 727, Elkhart, IN 46515. If you go to the Conn website today you will see they currently produce Armstrong Flutes. My guess is since the Artley reputation never took off they discontinued that name and just kept the Armstrong brand for Flutes.

Not sure what value this information is but I figured it may help piece together the History of these Artley Flutes.

Silversorcerer
Posts: 43
Joined: Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby Silversorcerer » Thu Sep 05, 2013 12:37 am

My aunt, who lives in a retirement home, let me take her flute which she no longer plans on trying to play again, with the idea that I would find a good home for it (and give her the money when and if I sell it, which wasn't mentioned but is certainly what I intend). However, although a longtime musician with what I like to think is a good ear, I have no clue about flutes. So although I have read most of the posts here about Artleys, I really don't know what I have (e.g., no idea what a C- or B-foot is, or whether it's a Wilkins or a Powell). What I do see is that it is a Symphony, made in Elkhart, the lettering inline with the body. Nowhere on it does it say "Silver" (or any other metal), although there happens to be a 3M "Silver Protector Strip" in the case, and it certainly looks (from what corrosion there is) as though it's silver-plated. What also throws me a bit, after poking around the web trying to find out about serial numbers, is that either there is none, or else the serial number is the same *four* digits -- beginning with "9" -- stamped near one end of each of the three sections of the instrument. I have no illusions about having some mysterious magical masterpiece of musical manufacture, and assume it's a student model, but is there any way I can find out more from looking at it, *before* I take it into a shop and have somebody look it over (and tell me they'll give me a quarter of what I later find out it's really worth)?

Cheers!

Kerry in Portland, Oregon
I recently scored a very pristine early silver plated Symphony model that included fresh pads and a good set up. The serial is only four digits, 3992;- obviously there were Artley flutes that pre-dated 1952, but I think the serial chart starts there because that was when production and distribution took off. It came in an original vintage slim case with a brass stamped ARTLEY logo and even had the tenon protector sleeves and cleaning tool. It plays very well, IMO, but does not have the strength or clarity that of some later Artley models I have collected that have the silver head. I suspect yours has an old style sculpted lip plate shape and different embouchure hole from the 60s Artleys. The lip plates tended to lose some curves as years went by. Also this early Artley Symphony does not have the familiar five position lines on the head and the position notch on the front of the barrel ring. The position notch is on the rear of the barrel ring and the serial number digits can be used as position guides.

Later Symphony models have the designation Symphony 77-0. These appear to be the Symphony models with the SILVER designation on the head joint.

An aside;- early F.E. Olds & Sons Special flutes appear to be the same flute as the early Artley Symphony. Keywork is identical as are the barrel rings, end rings, lip plate, and all other pertinent details. The crowns are slightly different. Later Olds Special flutes also have the Artley style position marks and silver heads with an identical SILVER notice above the position markers. By all appearances, Artley built the Olds Special models based on the Artley Symphony.

The later practice with serials was to put only the last 3 digits on the head, although I have also seen Artleys with no numbers on the heads. I have a small collection of the early Artley models;- a 105, and a 110 from the early 50's. The 105 looks like a basic student model, the 110 has an unusual foot mechanism that incorporates an adjustment screw to sync the C & C# keys. Other than that, it looks like the 105. I've never seen another model or maker with that mechanism, which is quite convenient.

One of my favorites is a 1962 open hole model (serial 100045) that is simply marked Artley Elkhart, Ind. It has a silver head, crown missing and has been played to the point that the plating on several keys is gone and the brass underneath is pitted, but it still plays very easily and sounds really rich. By all appearances it still has the original pads, although I'm sure replacing them would improve it somewhat.

Silversorcerer
Posts: 43
Joined: Tue Jul 02, 2013 6:36 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby Silversorcerer » Thu Sep 05, 2013 11:19 am

For those who have the two part Artleys, this might be an interesting interview. Thomas' first flute was a two part specimen, not sure of the maker. I do know there were other makers. I think one of them was Conn.

http://www.namm.org/library/oral-history/mark-thomas

saxistpig
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 12:37 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby saxistpig » Tue Apr 29, 2014 12:59 pm

Hello, all.

I'm new here and I'm really enjoying this thread - lots if good info on these Artleys! I have a question about identifying Artleys by model.

jmdewey60 posted a pic that's seems nearly identical to an Artley I'm trying to ID. The serial # is 5 digits (54xxx), dating it to the late 50s. Beyond that, it looks just like jmdewey's pic - open hole, y-arms, c-foot, no markings other than "ELKHART-IND." underneath the Artley logo (except for the graduated 'hash' marks on the head-joint [under the "silver" stamp] for adjustment purposes).

My question is, is this a specific 'model' of Artley flute (like the 50s, 18s, Wilkins etc.)? Or, at this point, was Artley just cranking out generic flutes without differentiating them by model names/numbers?

Thanks.

rsamsonpicc
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 5:44 am

Re: Artley flute

Postby rsamsonpicc » Sun Nov 09, 2014 5:58 am

I'm a BIG fan of Artley flutes!!! I have tons of them!!! But I also have a Haynes, Powell and Miyazawa! I also have an Armstrong Heritage which is the equivalent model to Artley's Wilkins model. I have a Wilkins model too, and an Artley 38-0 which some refer to the Wilkins model, but it isn't. The Wilkins model had "Artley" engraved on the Barrel, Headjoint and footjoint. I prefer Artley's that were made in Nogales, Arizona. I own models 4-0 (inline G, open hole,solid silver head, B foot) 8-0 (inline G, open hole, silver head, body and foot, plated keys, C foot) 9-0 (same as 8-0, but with B foot) Wilkins model (inline G, open hole, C foot, ALL silver) and 38-0 (inline G, open hole, B foot, ALL silver).

Artley flutes look and feel like commercial Powell flutes. They are sturdy too! My Artley Wilkins actually plays better and louder than my thin wall handmade Haynes!

I don't care for the Artley flutes that were made by Armstrong. They are basically Armstrong flutes with the Artley name on it!

rsamsonpicc
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Joined: Sun Nov 09, 2014 5:44 am

Re: Artley flute

Postby rsamsonpicc » Sun Nov 09, 2014 6:38 am

Anyone have any information on an Artley Model 6-0. Serial number (399903) indicates it was made in 1974. It is stamped with the Nogales address on the head stamp as well as having the word silver stamped on all 3 pieces. I have not been able to find out any information on this model Artley. Any information would be appreciated.

This how these Artley models paired up 4-0 and 5-0 (open hole, inline G, Silver headjoint, B footjoint on 4-0 and C footjoint on 5-0). 6-0 and 7-0 (closed hole, offset G, silver headjoint, body and foot, plated keys, B foot on 6-0 and C foot on 7-0). 8-0 and 9-0 (open hole, inline G, silver headjoing, body and foot, C foot on the 8-0 and B foot on the 9-0) 6-0, 7-0, 8-0 and 9-0 have white gold springs and the 4-0 and 5-0 have phosphor bronze springs.

sikuchalla
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Joined: Sat Dec 06, 2014 2:20 pm

Re: Artley flute

Postby sikuchalla » Sat Dec 06, 2014 2:25 pm

Hi rsamsonpicc. I have a 9-0 that has a problematic B foot and would like to find a used C foot from a 8-0 or even a 4-0 or 6-0, Maybe from a cheap flute on eBay to get the foot and adjust it. My question is, are they all compatible, diameter wise?

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Sat Dec 06, 2014 6:30 pm

What is problematic with the B foot? Unless it has been run over by a truck or had some similarly bad damage to it, a flute repair tech should be able to correct whatever ails it. If you buy another foot (C or B) on the internet, it will likely have to be fitted by a flute tech anyway even if it is an exact replacement. Whatever you buy may be in need of repairs too, so you are right back where you started. In situations like this, is usually better to repair what you have or sell it / trade it in and buy a good quality new flute.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--


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