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Artley flute

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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nasxxx
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Re: Artley flute

Postby nasxxx » Thu Apr 28, 2011 3:45 pm

Image

Bit of a bump for a old post, cus of my Pearl is too badley dinged now, i've purchased a Artley 108-0 flute open hole B-foot similar logo to the one above, with serial number 44 125XX
Is this a 1953 model ??

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Thu Apr 28, 2011 5:25 pm

For Artley flutes with a two-digit prefix, add 50 to the prefix for the year of manufacture. So, 44+50=94 or 1994.

http://www.conn-selmer.com/content/reso ... rialno.php
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

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nasxxx
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Re: Artley flute

Postby nasxxx » Fri Apr 29, 2011 1:21 am

didnt realise the +50 strange cus the documentaion I have says "C.G. CONN, Elkhart, Indiana," guessing then its not the Elkhart manufacture but the other one I thought the 108-0 / B-foots were pre 1970.

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Fri Apr 29, 2011 8:48 am

After C.G. Conn bought Artley in 1969, they moved the Artley manufacturing from Elkhart, IN to Nogales, AZ during the 1970s. Around 1980, Conn ownership changed again and Artley flutes were moved back to Elkhart. The logos engraved on the flutes changed with each move (at least on the student models like the 18-0 Prelude - I'm not certain if that holds true for all of the models). The exact dates are little fuzzy, but, based upon examples I've seen and correlated to serial numbers/years:
Pre-1970 - Artley Elkhart, Ind
~70-~80 - Artley Nogales
~80s-?? - Artley USA
~90s-?? - Artley

I have not seen enough of the 108-0 models to determine if the above logos hold true on that model, or even if the 108-0 was produced after 1980. But, for the serial numbers, Conn-Selmer's web site does not list any exceptions for the 2-digit prefix rule, so I assume it applies. If you really want your question answered authoritatively, you could try writing to Conn-Selmer to ask for confirmation.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

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nasxxx
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Re: Artley flute

Postby nasxxx » Fri Apr 29, 2011 12:22 pm

pied_piper thanks for you help there cheers

MatekiMan
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Re: Artley flute

Postby MatekiMan » Sun May 29, 2011 11:17 pm

In 1962 my father purchased a Wilkins model Artley for me. I played it through college. While studying with James Pellerite at Indiana University in 1968, he suggested I try a new headjoint. I believe he was consulting with the Artley company at the time. In any case he brought me 4 or 5 headjoints which I played for a couple of weeks before deciding on one. I believe I traded him the original Artley headjoint and paid an additional $75 for the new one. I still have the flute, serial number, 90028, which dates it to 1962 on the chart. I use it strictly as my back up instrument these days, but am always surprised how good it feels when I pick it up. It's in incredibly fine shape, not even a scratch. I went to a clinic Frederick Wilkins played in Chicago Heights, IL in 1964. He played my instrument afterwards and mentioned how well it responded for him. I appreciated everyone who has contributed to this thread, I've enjoyed following along!

rexesrule
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Re: Artley flute

Postby rexesrule » Tue May 31, 2011 9:33 pm

I've had an Artley Wilkins since 1969. I purchased it for half price from a fire sale at a music store, and I think it cost about $600 at the time, which was about half price. It smelled of smoke for years after I got it. It was a replacement for a cheap, nickel-plated Artley student model in a brown case, and it came in a slightly larger black case that was very similar, not at all like most high-line flute cases, although it was lined with very soft blue velvet, versus the shaggy red velvet in the cheaper flutes' cases. The Wilkins was the top-of-the line Artley, made in Elkhart, Indiana, and I think by the time I got the flute, the company had moved to Nogales, Arizona and the model had been discontinued. Artleys got really cheesy after that. The Wilkins Model came with a little brochure with a picture of Frederick Wilkins, a premiere flutist, who had been involved in the design of this flute. Big, deal, I thought, at that stage of my life.

I played this flute in high school, and it served me fairly well; however, it always had tuning problems and a weird head joint, and looking back, I think I had a lot more trouble playing it than I should have. It also came without a gizmo key, but it did come with a set of plugs for the inline open holes, so that previous closed-hole flutists could adjust to the deep grooves around the somewhat large holes on the Wilkins model keys. This solid-silver flute is very heavy, and I know it was made to emulate a Powell, but I think that was a real stretch, since I got to play my teacher's Powell a few times, and it was not at at all similar. Around my junior year in high school, my teacher suggested I try a Sankyo Prima that she had been sent to try out by her Powell dealer, and after playing the Sankyo with the unusual ridged mouthpiece, I was sold on Sankyo. My whole attitude towards flute playing, and certainly my tone, was transformed when I got my Sankyo, and the Wilkins was therefore relegated to a back-up and subsequently very seldom played. Over the years, I have had the Wilkins model back out, I replaced the case for something a bit more dignified, and eventually I even had it overhauled, but I have to say that I've always looked at this flute as my "fire sale" acquisition. Probably it is a very nice flute, but maybe for somebody with bigger fingers, and maybe with a different mouthpiece. I'll try it again some day. :)

saintangelfire
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Re: Artley flute

Postby saintangelfire » Wed Nov 23, 2011 6:41 pm

I found this website while looking for information on a flute I purchased on a 'fluke'; named Haydn...still don't know who made it, wondered if it was possibly and early Haynes student line although it does have the b foot and open holes, it deffinatly looks old with the rounder emboucher hole and three bars to connect the keys to running down the back of it.

I just wanted to add that in 1974 I purchased an Artley 9-0 which was supposed to be a 'step up' from the 4-0. Mine had white gold springs, in line open hole keys, b foot joint and it was solid silver thin wall. The flute had a tonal quality that beat out just about every one else. These are very hard to find and incidently, have not found one like the one I had since. I am setteling with an Emerson Eld model to restart playing after a thirty year hiatus. Miss my Artley. I believe they were severely underrated, and was disappointed to find out that they were bought by Conn and no longer made. Does anyone know anything about the 9-0 (such as a name for it besides a number) and what would be a comparable model in todays market. Also, if anyone has any information concerning this Haydn I purchased, or a Gretsch student line I own, please contact me or answer the post. Thank you in advance. :?: :?:

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pied_piper
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Re: Artley flute

Postby pied_piper » Thu Nov 24, 2011 10:09 am

The lineage of the Artley models and names is not always clear or complete. Artley made several step-up and professional models under various names: Artist, Super Artist, Symphony, and Wilkins. From your description, I would guess that it probably was an Artist or Super Artist.

The only site that I know of that makes the association of name to model number is here:
http://cderksen.home.xs4all.nl/ConnOModels.html

However, it is not an "official" site and they acknowledge that their list is incomplete and may contain errors. It also lists Conn flutes along with the Artleys because Conn bought Artley and they used similar model numbers, so that may blur the lines a bit... They list the 9-O model as a wood flute in Db, so maybe that was referring to a Conn model number rather than an Artley.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

thehollyscene
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Re: Artley flute

Postby thehollyscene » Thu Jan 05, 2012 1:17 am

So I know this thread is a bit old but I thought I would throw in my two cents. haha
I read all of this thread because it's really interesting, especially because I own an Artley. I have what I'm pretty sure is a silver plated Artley, with open holes, offset G and a C foot. The model number is 15-0-OFF and the serial number is 702xxx. I haven't been able to figure out exactly when this model was made either. My dad bought it for me for $150 used on eBay right before 9th grade (so 2007) because I thought I needed a step-up flute for high school. I'm now about to start my second semester of college (in my freshman year) and am purchasing a new flute (as soon as tomorrow!!) to pursue a music minor (I'm an English major).
I must say my Artley really has been good to me all these years. In 9th grade, I sat on it (so embarrassing omg) the week before Large Group Performance Evaluation so we had it fixed immediately but if you look really hard, right below the Ab key, there's a mark where the body had "caved in." I got second chair of Wind Ensemble (my school's top band out of 3 and we were seriously good) on it my junior year and did a lot of clinics with it. When I went to the Wind Symphony auditions for my university this past semester (to play for fun), the band director/prof and orchestra director/prof doing the auditions were impressed at the tone I got out of it and I ended up getting 4th out of 8 flutists (the rest of which are all music majors, I might add). I've honestly had no playing problems on it either, until recently, which I've really just attributed to me outgrowing the flute, as well as probably age. It's also got quite a bit of cosmetic issues now, another reason why I'm upgrading. The silver plating has completely worn off on the thumb Bb key and worn off on various other keys, which I guess is standard after using it excessively for five years. I'm kind of sad to be moving on to another flute but at the same time, I'm excited to increase my tone and performance ability.

Anyways, I just wanted to add to this discussion on the Artleys. Sorry my response is a little long.

FluteyFani
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Re: Artley flute

Postby FluteyFani » Wed Feb 01, 2012 2:14 pm

Hello all. I am a new member to this forum. I live in Jamaica(Reggae country)and have been to this site many times and got good answers to what I have been searching for.

I have an Artley 5-0-B, bought new in 1982(serial #642718).

The problem I have involve some end screws(trill and index) are backing out when I play. I have re-padded it and used nail polish to try and stop the screws from unwinding. The situation is whether I should move on or repair the Artley 5-0-B. It is corroded and has lost the silver plating on most of it. The head joint, which is silver is quite good, although it need a head cork. I will say that because it has been my first flute bought of me, I feel somehow attached to it.

I do have other flutes, just recently bought, between August 2011- January 2012 (two Artleys,Wilkins,a closed hole #157189, two Gemeinhardt 3SHBs, an Emerson ELD, and a Yamaha 281). All being bought used.
The Wilkins was stored for over 30 years and had a single owner. The pads need to be changed but I do get sound easily in the left hand. Should I repad the Wilkins and forget the 5-0-B since I believe it could cost more to refurbish it than to repad the Wilkins?

Lastly, Is there a leak? When I play, there seem to be vibration in my left fingers. Especially the middle finger(one between index and ring) regardless of the flute I am playing. Sometimes it feel as though air is hitting that finger.

Thanks for your responses.

FluteyFani

jim22
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Re: Artley flute

Postby jim22 » Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:37 pm

It might be time to retire the old artley. I also have one that is badly corroded. I buffed and painted the keys on my artley piccolo. The headjoint could be fitted to one of the newer ones. Headjoint corks are easy to replace.

If you had a leak, notes played with keys closed on the right hand would not play.

reygbautista
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Re: Artley flute

Postby reygbautista » Sun Feb 12, 2012 3:57 am

i bought an artley wilkins model last year at ebay. it is an b foot, open hole, all silver. i bought an artley to form part of my collection of flutes. i still believe it is still professional quality up to this time but not the top of of its class. the lip plate provides ease in playing as well the having the keys to respond properly. my artley requires only cleaning only my the flute technician and needed no change in pads.

cgp
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Re: Artley flute

Postby cgp » Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:19 am

Does anyone know anything about the 1954 Artley two-piece flute? I have one from when I was a child and the serial number is 18749. It needs new pads, I think, and I'm trying to decide whether it's worth the trouble. Also have the original case.

wenatchi
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Re: Artley flute VALUE OF SILVER????

Postby wenatchi » Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:04 pm

I have an old Artley flute with the markings:

Artley
-->110<--
Elkhart, Ind
U.S.A
Serial #14xxx

From what I've read that means it was made in 1953 and is silverplated (the "ting" vs "thunk" test) plus I don't find any markings of "s" or "silver." It is closed hole. It is fairly pitted and the head piece looks like to was compressed at the open end so it's not perfectly round. The case does not have an Artley marking and is a little damaged. I am trying to decide what to do with it. I would hate for a young flutist to have it since it would not sound very well and is not pretty at all. Are there any solid silver parts in a silver plate flute that would have reclamation value? I don't want it to sit on a shelf anymore.
Last edited by wenatchi on Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:06 am, edited 1 time in total.


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