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Split E or no split E?

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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indiespyllak
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 5:02 pm

Split E or no split E?

Postby indiespyllak » Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:36 am

Hello flutists! :-)

I am about to buy a flute (I am on the 8th grade but never had my own flute till now) but I have some doubts regarding its characteristics.
My main question is regarding the Split E. OpinionS differ much on that topic and many flutists believe that a Split E makes the flute's mechanism weaker in depth of time. What is your opinion?
All these years I have been playing with an Inline without a split E and usually had no issues. However, the only flute I can find ready-to-deliver in here is the Yamaha YFL 272 which has a split E. I'm ready to get accostumated to an Offset G but I'm in doubt if it worths it or not to get one with a Split E. If there is a possibility of making it weaker, then I should better opt for another, no matter the time of delivering.

Thank you in advance!

Cheers!

User avatar
pied_piper
Posts: 1615
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2007 1:31 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: Split E or no split E?

Postby pied_piper » Fri Sep 01, 2017 3:21 pm

There are pros and cons to the split E.

PRO:
Improved 3rd octave E with
  • Better response on that note
  • Less prone to cracking
  • Often, the intonation is improved on the 3rd octave E
CON:
  • Some trills won't work or are impaired
  • With inline G mechanism, sometimes there is a tendency for the mechanism to bind slightly (offset G does not have this issue)
A properly designed split E should not weaken the mechanism. Most well-known brands have no issue in this regard. Cheap flutes may exhibit this problem. The Yamaha flutes are well-built and you should have no problem with the split E mechanism.

Regarding getting used to an offset G, you will find that you can quickly adjust to either inline or offset. I have several flutes. Some are inline, some are offset. Some have Split E, some don't. I can easily switch between any of them. You can too, and it shouldn't take more than a week or so of playing to make the transition...

I hope that helps!
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

indiespyllak
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2014 5:02 pm

Re: Split E or no split E?

Postby indiespyllak » Sat Sep 02, 2017 10:38 am

There are pros and cons to the split E.

PRO:
Improved 3rd octave E with
  • Better response on that note
  • Less prone to cracking
  • Often, the intonation is improved on the 3rd octave E
CON:
  • Some trills won't work or are impaired
  • With inline G mechanism, sometimes there is a tendency for the mechanism to bind slightly (offset G does not have this issue)
A properly designed split E should not weaken the mechanism. Most well-known brands have no issue in this regard. Cheap flutes may exhibit this problem. The Yamaha flutes are well-built and you should have no problem with the split E mechanism.

Regarding getting used to an offset G, you will find that you can quickly adjust to either inline or offset. I have several flutes. Some are inline, some are offset. Some have Split E, some don't. I can easily switch between any of them. You can too, and it shouldn't take more than a week or so of playing to make the transition...

I hope that helps!
Thank you very much dear pied_piper! Your answer was really helpful! Cheers!


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