Flute Injury

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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tarzaflute
Posts: 131
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2003 6:59 am

Flute Injury

Post by tarzaflute » Thu Jun 05, 2003 5:31 am

Hi, I noticed today, and a little bit yesterday, that down
the side of my hand aches when I play my flute. I''m not sure if its cause I
just changed from closed hole to open hole and i have to adjust to the hand
positioning or if its something more serious. Its down the side of my hand where
my little finger is, has anyone got any ideas on what might be the cause of this
or what I should do? Thanks for your time. Tara!
Tara!

krisgmusic
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:56 pm

Flute Injury

Post by krisgmusic » Sun Aug 31, 2003 11:11 pm

Is it your left or right hand? If it's your left hand,
you have probably switched to an "in line G" key system. For some people, it's
quite a stretch and it is uncomfortable. My flute wasn't available with the
left hand G key at an angle, so I just plug the hole. My ring fingers are
considerably shorter than my index finger, which is unusual. If I ever buy a new
flute, I will not purchase an "in line G" model... If it's your right hand, you
may be straining to cover the ring finger open hole. That might be from more of
a collapsed hand position in your right hand. You could try having someone face
you and cup their hand backwards under your right hand when you play, forming a
"ball" kind of feel inside your hand while you play. This helps break many
people of their collapsed right hand habits. If it's your right hand pinky,
then you could be playing the Eb, C#, C, and low B natural keys with a
straightened pinky finger, causing tension in your hand and wrist. This is very
bad indeed. If this is the case, careful monitoring of your playing position,
hand position, and stretching are in order. Best of luck to you. Don't let it
get too out of control before you figure it out or seek help! krisgay@msn.com

krisgmusic
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:56 pm

Flute Injury

Post by krisgmusic » Sun Aug 31, 2003 11:15 pm

You know I forgot to mention this... Sometimes my students
get achy pains in the side of either one hand or both hands because they are
just plain gripping the flute too tightly. Maybe you are just concentrating so
hard on covering the open holes that you are gripping very hard and causing
tension which tightens the muscles on the outside of the palm of your hand. You
can feel these if you hold the inside palm of your hand under your pinky finger
and then squeeze your hand with your fingers perpendicular to your palm but not
totally flat (straight out). It causes the muscles there to contract very
tightly. Most musicians have quite a bit of muscle there. Try massaging there
and stretching your hands by pushing your fingers together in a "steeple" or
stretching the entire palm of the hand by pushing the hands together with the
elbows to the side.

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Flute Injury

Post by Penny » Mon Sep 01, 2003 10:50 am

I like the tension and squezing too hard hints. Also we
really need to get the information out that almost no one should be playing an
inline flute. Many old guard players and teachers carry on the tradition of the
inline which has no advantages and many disadvantages especially ergonomically
where it causes hand and wrist problems. If you are stuck with an inline there
are some makeshift and professional solutions to correct some of the problems
they create. But if you are a parent or teacher don't let your little flute
player get an inline flute. Boehm was right the french were wrong, actually the
french were cheap. The inline is cheaper to produce and the only reason it even
exists. Also have a teacher check your hand and wrist position.

User avatar
fluteluversmom
Posts: 295
Joined: Sun May 11, 2003 10:22 pm

Flute Injury

Post by fluteluversmom » Thu Sep 04, 2003 7:39 pm

Hmmm..I guess I have to disagree here. My daughter plays
an inline and I don't consider her "stuck" with it. Gasp...I can hear it
now..the poor girl plays a Gemienhardt..and inline ?? In the 2 years of playing
she has never complained of any pain or uncomfort and yes her fingers are all
the right length and she shows no signs of playing for Barnum and Bailey !! I on
the other hand have a hard time when playing on her flute and prefer my offset.
Kim [quote] ---------------- On 9/1/2003 10:50:48 AM If you are stuck with an
inline there are some makeshift and professional solutions to correct some of
the problems they create. But if you are a parent or teacher don't let your
little flute player get an inline flute. Boehm was right the french were wrong,
actually the french were cheap. The inline is cheaper to produce and the only
reason it even exists. Also have a teacher check your hand and wrist position.
---------------- [/quote]
Some
days you catch the bus and other days it runs over you.

piccylo789
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2003 5:33 pm

Flute Injury

Post by piccylo789 » Sat Dec 27, 2003 4:50 pm

I have an open holed inline G flute and I don't find any
problems with it. I have no hand or wrist problems from it and have found no
disadvandtages to it. The only problem with my hands I've ever had is that my
right pinkey gets sore and that because of a former softball injury. I was
wondering whether you had an inline flute or an offset? Have you tried both?
Trying both could show you all the differences to it.
<<Piccy
Lo>>

piccylo789
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Dec 11, 2003 5:33 pm

Flute Injury

Post by piccylo789 » Sat Dec 27, 2003 4:55 pm

Don't worry. I have an open holed inline flute for the
first year of my playing I kept corks in the holes. DUring my second year of
playing I started playing with out the corks... I took them out one at a time.
You will feel some pain or tension just until you get used to it. By the time
you play fluently on an open holed flute your hands should be used to it. If
they're not, look into it further. But for now, it's normal. <<piccy lo>>
<<Piccy
Lo>>

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

Flute Injury

Post by MattMom » Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:12 pm

If you just switched to open holes, along with your hand
position, some of the problem may be your actual FLUTE position. I just switched
myself, and am in the process of going through the adjustment. I found that I
had gotten somewhat lazy and let my flute drop - causing my head to tilt to the
side, and my hands to be out of position. If I hold my flute horizontally, I get
better coverage on the holes without causing my hands to cramp. I have an offset
G on my silver flute - it is definitely more comfortable for me, but I think I
have shorter fingers. **Note to any teachers out there** PLEEEEASE tell me if my
advice is incorrect, since, as I said, I'm working out the open hole thing
myself. Thanks. Cate

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Flute Injury

Post by Penny » Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:20 pm

There is a whole industry out there making extensions and
other "fixes" for problems flute have because of ergonomics. Not the least but
certainly not the only problem is cased by inline flutes. In the 2 years of
playing she has never complained of any pain or uncomfort Reminds me of my
freinds uncle who smoked for 40 years and never got lung cancer so why would
anyone think there is something wrong with cigarettes? Play what you like, I
make no money either way. But the evidence is overwhelming against inline and
for offset.

User avatar
fluteluversmom
Posts: 295
Joined: Sun May 11, 2003 10:22 pm

Flute Injury

Post by fluteluversmom » Sat Dec 27, 2003 5:38 pm

Reminds me of the mother of the girl that sits 2nd chair
in my daughters school band LOL[;)] [quote] >>Reminds me of my freinds uncle who
smoked for 40 years and never got lung cancer so why would anyone think there is
something wrong with cigarettes?
Some
days you catch the bus and other days it runs over you.

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