Matit carbon fibre flutes- anybody ever played one?

Flute History and Instrument Purchase

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Wildlion
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Matit carbon fibre flutes- anybody ever played one?

Post by Wildlion » Wed Jun 21, 2006 1:19 pm

I guess the subject line speaks for itself. I recently came across the website. www.matitflutes.com. Unfortunately, there only seems to be one distributor in the US and his number has been disconected.

I'd be interested to know what the experience was of anybody who has managed to lay their hands on one. Is the sound different than metal? Does it project? Color? Tone?

Anybody that has insight, please share. I'd appreciate it.

DFlute
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Post by DFlute » Tue Jul 04, 2006 8:22 am

I share your interest in those Euro-made carbon flutes! Those look so cool!

I actually tried to send an e mail to the manufacturer (via his web site) over a year ago. Unfortunately, I do not think he understood me(language issue).

I would also love to get my hands on one of those flutes! If you hear anything, or actually try one, I would love to hear about it! I also tried to convince the local music store here to carry one! Unfortunately with little success :(

Alas...
those who hear not the music think the dancers mad

Wildlion
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Post by Wildlion » Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:41 am

The fellow in the US is a fellow named Neil Krane in Boston. He is the only US distributor, for some reason. He has not responded to three emails and the only phone number listed (which is the only one Matti Kahonen has) has been connected.

I wrote back and forth with the flutemaker, Matti Kahonen, who was very pleasant. I don't think that he was aware that his US distributor was unable to be located, either. He seemd surprised when I couldn't reach him, and he tried and couldn't, either. Weird.

He did send me a price list attachment, which I was unable to open, but he noted to me that the Model "T" was almost $11,000 (which may have been why the local flute store was resistant). But as with any flute, it must be played to determine whether its right, or just some flash in the pan fad. None of the high end distribtuors that I have worked with have ever played, much less carried one.

michael
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Post by michael » Thu Aug 03, 2006 9:29 pm

I have read in other posts, on other sites, that the clapping noise of the keys of the matit flute was an audible problem, which the folks at Matit were trying to solve. Originally, they were trying to make an inexpensive flute but they got involved in breaking new ground. They had to go full-dream! I do not blame them. I hope that they, or someone, realizes this goal.

I love the idea of the magnetic "springs"! I am attracted by the durability and the rigidity of the carbon fiber: I am convinced that, regardless of material, relative rigitiy is an important key to the artistic transmision of the sound wave. That, properly being controld, will affect the warmth or the coldness, and the resistance and responce of the flute. You may well know about the contoversy over seamed tube verses non-seamed tubes. Well, the hamering that may be involved in forming a seamed tube can harden, and make for a more efficient transmitter of the sound, but so, too, can pulling, with serious polishing!

I would love to try a Matit someday. I love the idea and the look!

Do not give up, Matit.

Michael LaFosse
Origamido Studio

a_stoyanov
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Post by a_stoyanov » Sat Oct 14, 2006 12:31 pm

I just played my teacher's Matit. It's a very interesting experience. This flute is like no other flute i've ever played. It feels about 30-40% lighter than my Yamaha and is also very balanced. I did notice the "clapping" that people talk about, but it isn't a huge problem. It is very easy to play and it's also very responsive. The sound is not very good for classical music but it's great for jazz. I guess because of the stiff body there are a lot of partials above the main pitch witch is kind of cool. It sounds rich but it isn't very clear. If you are a jazz player it is deffinitely worth trying.

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briolette
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Post by briolette » Mon Oct 16, 2006 7:37 am

How fascinating! I'd never heard of this kind of flute before and would love to try one. Thanks for sharing the link.

DFlute
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matik flute envy

Post by DFlute » Sat Nov 25, 2006 6:25 pm

Wow Stoy!
Thanks for sharing about the flute and its potential jazz capabilities. It sounds like you must have a very exciting flute teacher!!!

8)
I want a teacher with cool tootie toys too...(whining)!

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