Concertino by C. Chaminade

Performace Tips, Advanced Technique and More

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picc_chick#1
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Concertino by C. Chaminade

Post by picc_chick#1 » Tue Nov 16, 2004 10:23 pm

:!:I'm 13 years ld and im about half way done learning this song. any suggestions? the sextuplets are the worst and since it has a piano accompianment, how am i supposed to make sure that these are together with the accompianment? but yeah any suggestions would help! thank you!
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powayflute01
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Post by powayflute01 » Wed Nov 17, 2004 11:51 pm

I've never played the concertino before (well, okay; I've played it before, but not for anything specific and not with accompaniment) but anyway...I would recommend that you look over the piano part where the sextuplets are, and have your pianist play his/her part for you a few times. You should really solidify that sound in your head, and take care to listen for it when you play and try to stay in pulse. Also, practicing with a metronome would definitely help and if you can, playing along with a recording of the piece could be equally beneficial. Good luck!
Haha, this one is my favorite: :shock:
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sarah_and_flute
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Post by sarah_and_flute » Fri Dec 03, 2004 9:47 am

Metronomes are your friend! It's the only way you're going to get those sextuplets in time :D Set it quite slow to start with. Also, have you got a recording of the accompaniment? You can doownload a MIDI file of the whole thing from http://www4.osk.3web.ne.jp/~kasumitu/eng.htm <-- there! If you have a programme on your computer like Sound Studio or MidiNotate, you can separate the piano part and the flute part, then slow down the accompaniment as you need :) If you don't, I could probably separate it for you and send you the file if you like!

I'm sorry this post is so late, you probably don't need it anymore ^-^

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flutegirl49
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Post by flutegirl49 » Fri Feb 04, 2005 10:39 pm

sarah_and_flute wrote:Metronomes are your friend! It's the only way you're going to get those sextuplets in time :D Set it quite slow to start with. Also, have you got a recording of the accompaniment? You can doownload a MIDI file of the whole thing from http://www4.osk.3web.ne.jp/~kasumitu/eng.htm <-- there! If you have a programme on your computer like Sound Studio or MidiNotate, you can separate the piano part and the flute part, then slow down the accompaniment as you need :) If you don't, I could probably separate it for you and send you the file if you like!

I'm sorry this post is so late, you probably don't need it anymore ^-^
Wow thank you for that link! Its VERY helpful!

Also.. if your performing a piece with a accompaniment WHERE do you find a piano accompaniast? And how much do they normally charge?

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Sat Feb 05, 2005 9:57 pm

Places to find an accompanist:
1. local churches
2. look up the local piano teacher for suggestions (such as advanced students or even his/her self)
3. local university (if there is one)
4. local highschool choir director/accompanist
5. local elementary or middle school music teacher
6. check with music stores (they sometimes have a list of musicians in the area)
7. friends or parnets/relatives of friends
8. post a flier in your school (there may be a piano player in your school who is looking for opportunities to play)

Just some suggestions. As for how much they charge, it depends greatly on where you are, how difficult the music is and how much experience they have. I have paid $10-$20 an hour for student accompanists from a local university, with great results. I am now blessed with an AMAZING accompanist who charges $50 an hour, but he is EVERY BIT worth it! He is kind enough to not charge me for his rehearsal time, but some do. You may be lucky enough to find someone who will play because they like to play and not charge you anything. Be sure that you take time to actually hear him/her play one of your pieces before entering into any sort of agreement.

Some accompanists will record a tape for you to use to practice with. I like this because I can take time to get used to his/her style as well as learn the piece. Be sure to give him/her time to learn the music before requesting a tape.

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flutegirl49
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Post by flutegirl49 » Sun Feb 06, 2005 10:21 pm

fluttiegurl wrote:Places to find an accompanist:
1. local churches
2. look up the local piano teacher for suggestions (such as advanced students or even his/her self)
3. local university (if there is one)
4. local highschool choir director/accompanist
5. local elementary or middle school music teacher
6. check with music stores (they sometimes have a list of musicians in the area)
7. friends or parnets/relatives of friends
8. post a flier in your school (there may be a piano player in your school who is looking for opportunities to play)

Just some suggestions. As for how much they charge, it depends greatly on where you are, how difficult the music is and how much experience they have. I have paid $10-$20 an hour for student accompanists from a local university, with great results. I am now blessed with an AMAZING accompanist who charges $50 an hour, but he is EVERY BIT worth it! He is kind enough to not charge me for his rehearsal time, but some do. You may be lucky enough to find someone who will play because they like to play and not charge you anything. Be sure that you take time to actually hear him/her play one of your pieces before entering into any sort of agreement.

Some accompanists will record a tape for you to use to practice with. I like this because I can take time to get used to his/her style as well as learn the piece. Be sure to give him/her time to learn the music before requesting a tape.
wow thank you for all those excellent suggestions :D I will be sure to try some of those

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