Miyazawa flutes

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accidentaltourist
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Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 4:50 pm

Miyazawa flutes

Post by accidentaltourist » Sat May 29, 2010 5:21 pm

Would appreciate to have some expert view on the subject.

I am an adult "crash-course" beginner (taking advantage of the current economic downtime without a job) to try to advance quickly on the flute. So far my progress has not been bad on my Yamaha 381, but I have been tempted - wrongfully perhaps - to switch to a better flute. To make things worse, I made the detrimental move of selling the poor Yamaha last week, so I need to buy a new one quickly...

In my last trial of the flutes available in the shop, I have been seduced by the Miyazawa PB202 - how easy it was to make a sweet tone, esp. the high notes (I might have been fooled by the E facilitator, but the high G sounded very nice to me, as were the notes below G0). But then here comes the dispute with my teacher: he thinks that I will be better served by a flute with more "resistance" - I see clearly what he means, as I was already making inadvertent octave jumps on the Miyazawa (ie blowing too hard with habits from the Yamaha). He is warning me that easy tones at this stage will come at the price of tone coloring later on. (For the record, my teacher plays a Sankyo)

My head is telling me that my teacher is right. Afterall, my childhood hero Rampal stuck not only with Haynes, but the models with the highest resistance... But then my heart tells me that what the heck, at my age I will never take any flute exam, nor will I have any chance to go professional...

Any comment is most welcomed!!

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Sat May 29, 2010 8:04 pm

You can get different headjoints with the Miyazawa. There are certainly cuts that require more resistance. At the same time you need to take into account that the cut on the Yamaha that you just sold was probably equipped with a CY cut headjoint. That cut is generally more resistant, and furthermore it was a 'student' version of that cut. It is therefore a design that helps you control your sound. The Miyazawa you tried had a professional grade headjoint and it requires a lot more control from the player. So, that is part of the problem as well. You aren't used to playing on this caliber of flute.

I would say that you should try out different headjoint cuts with Miyazawa since you already like their flutes and want one of them. Have your teacher listen to the cuts to help you find the best match for you.

Arianna
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Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:28 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Post by Arianna » Sun May 30, 2010 9:15 am

I agree to try different headjoints. I also loved the sweet tone on those flutes. It was very different then any other flutes I had tried. Also, with nicer flutes you have a period of adjustment to it. So, I think you have to try several different flutes, and then realize that you will need time to grow into it. What works for your teacher may not work for you.

melodydad
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Location: Huntingdon, England

Post by melodydad » Mon May 31, 2010 10:37 am

When I decided to buy a better flute (after starting with a Trevor James Privilege), I really thought I would like the Miyazawa - I was convinced that is what I was going to buy - until I tried it - and ended up buying a Sankyo! After a year, I am sure that I made the right choice.

What do I know!
Sankyo CF201, Trevor James 'Privilege', Chinese Dizi . . . oh, and a Theremin!

accidentaltourist
Posts: 12
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 4:50 pm

Post by accidentaltourist » Thu Jun 17, 2010 3:26 am

Hey, a great many thanks for the insights!

Bad news: the shop I visited in Hong kong were doing a promotion on their Miyazawas last month. And I have missed the sales (sob...).

For the last two Miyazawas that are left behind, they simply cannot be compared to the one I tried a few months back. Either that previous one was exceptionally good, or these two are lemons...

Now I really realise that even flutes of the same model can be very different - the last time I couldn't even make a sankyo sound, but this time around there is this CF 201 that sounds just fine. I even managed to do a high D# E F F# G legato test... Sure there is this E mechanism, but afterall I am just a beginner...

Completely stuck with the (lack of) choices... Worse still, I am buying away from home so my usual teacher can't help with the selection...

Arianna
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Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:28 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Post by Arianna » Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:58 am

You may want to wait until they can get in more options. Most stores will try to get in extras or more selection if asked. Don't rush into this...you will most likely be with this flute for a while. Personally, I love Sankyo's too...I played on one for 10 years and still have it. One of my students just bought the 201 and loves it...I think hers plays better then my Silver Sonic (I think that is the 301 model now), and mine had just been repadded and tweaked. They are good sturdy flutes. Good luck. Bummer you are buying away from your teacher. Can you find a local teacher that is recommended to maybe come in and give you their two cents? Could be work paying for a lesson.

cathy_miyazawa
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Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 8:41 am

Miyazawa Flute

Post by cathy_miyazawa » Tue Jun 22, 2010 8:48 am

Hello! Just wanted to reiterate that Miyazawa does indeed offer a headjoint choice and how much difference this can make for each individual. Depending on what you are looking for, there are different degrees of free-blowing vs. resistance - the key is finding the right balance for you: where you at in your development and what your and goals are. Please feel free to contact us anytime with questions! You can reach us at info@miyazawa.com or 1-800-967-6733.

Best wishes,
Cathy
Catherine Miller
Vice President
Miyazawa (US)
www.miyazawa.com

nicci_sfaflute
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Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 12:00 pm

Re: Miyazawa flutes

Post by nicci_sfaflute » Fri Oct 22, 2010 1:15 pm

Hi there!

I'm new to this forum but I'm familiar with phpBB, so yay! (random)

My second flute was a P101 with an equivalent to an MZ-6 which they don't make anymore (first flute was a Yamaha 381 I believe). The MZ-6 headjoint was good for me through high school but I needed something with more resistance to suit my preferences. Somehow in my sophomore year in high school, someone talked me into buying a Drellinger headjoint with very little resistance (Free-flo design with a platinum air reed). I liked it a lot then cuz it took less work to produce a sweet sound (which was a cop out to trying to produce a more focused embouchure and more support). My teacher at the time told me I would end up hating it because I couldn't get the depth and power that was required for some of my favorite pieces. It was not a good headjoint for producing different tone colors. So I ended up going back to the old headjoint. Finally about 2 years ago, in my last year as an undergrad, I bought a new flute - another Miyazawa! A Boston Classic (it's so heavy!!) and I chose an MZ-8 with a 9k lip-plate and 14k riser. This style of headjoint has a very rectangular tone hole and provides a LOT of resistance. It's perfect for my wide aperture and I tend to put a lot of air into the flute. Coming from the Drellinger, it was like trying to produce a sound from a brick (if you can imagine :)). But the resistance + the gold + the heavy-walled tubing provided a tone that was rich, fat, dark, warm, etc. All of the things I like, in other words (that's what I prefer, I'm not saying I think everyone should have this tone - on the contrary, it's quite nice to hear something different once in awhile). Therefore I have this to say:

If you desire a sweet and delicate tone, you should go with the path of *least resistance." Less resistance means cleaner attacks and less wind noise. If your air stream is too focused, though, it can produce "cracking."

If you desire to have a stronger and bolder sound, go with more resistance. More resistance requires more focus of the embouchure for clean attacks and to prevent a lot of wind noise. It also requires more support and a faster air stream.

Thanks for reading ^_^
Nicci

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flutego12
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Re: Miyazawa flutes

Post by flutego12 » Fri Apr 13, 2012 9:56 pm

Thanks for the animated sharing and great insights offered.

Was just at the online candystore, oggling the range of Miyazawa headjoints.

I have played the MZ-A before, which is v responsive and free blowing. Totally agree with some comments about the PB202 headjoint and its lack of resistance. Easy to play but limited colours, though have just learnt to control it from cracking.

Wondering how the MZ-7 and MZ-9 compares? Love the idea of "depth and tonal colours" - just not sure if I have the puff to release them.
1) am relatively new but on (hopefully) a fast-track
2) regrettably do not have thin (rampal) lips - rather moderately fleshy ones with a (still) maturing embouchure
3) do not have wide embouchure - just moderate.
4) do not want to double up with stock std current muramatsu headjoint which I currently have access to

I like the description of the MZ-9 but am wondering how the meeting of fleshier lips with a "generous resistance" headjoint would fare in the 3rd register. I am already spluttering (sometimes) on the Yamaha CY cut when tired.

And how much difference there is between a Sterling stock std MZ-A headjoint (oval cut) which I have - but want another one with different characteristics but only if justifiable - comparing:
Brittania silver (std wall) vs Sterling
with 9k vs 14k lip riser - is the difference significant? esp if played on a plated body? another silver body?

Eagerly awaiting your views .THks.
flutist with a screwdriver

fluteguy18
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Re: Miyazawa flutes

Post by fluteguy18 » Sat Apr 14, 2012 5:38 pm

I've never heard of an MZ-A headjoint made by Miyazawa. At the moment they make MZ6-11 (6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 11). All of the headjoints are very different and I feel that descriptions can be very deceptive. I think that you really have to try them. Just about any reputable store will allow you to try the flute out before you buy it. Even headjoints of the same make, model, and materials will play differently. They're high grade instruments and are all unique.

Try them first. If the company you are considering won't allow a trial, try someone else. Furthermore if the company won't guarantee the instrument I would suspect something fishy.

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flutego12
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Re: Miyazawa flutes

Post by flutego12 » Sun Apr 15, 2012 7:36 am

Neither have I heard of the MZ-A, except it is apparently a stock std SolidSilver headjoint for the "PA202 equivalent" built for the japanese market. Oval cut, free blowing, v articulate and responsive, bright, light, sweet tone. Great for the french repertoire - has good projection but not for orchestral. Very happy with it. Hvg said that I am gunning for a broader tonal pallette with greater depth, darker, hence am curious about the other headjoints. In particular #9 & #11 but I'm hearing good things about 7,8 & 10 as well.

Am in a catch22 situ, fluteguy.
My two preferred local establishments are class acts but you pay the sky for what you get and they are good - just so very very very very expensive. Hence feel bad going there to try w/o buying. Esp one of the salesperson there, is highly dilligent with excellent follow-up techniques. Will pay them a visit when I return to work and ready to contribute to the local economy. Right now, 2nd hand will have to do.

So far I have taken the chance on ebay and had 2 good experiences. But since I have had no real comparison, I don't really know if and what I'm missing out on and am depending on quality at source and the integrity of my vendors. I just scurry the items to my technician & teacher for assessment. I'd like to think that six months on I can tell (a little) as I do have some music background.

Be good if I can do headjoint trials - long distance though.
flutist with a screwdriver

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