Brogger system vs traditional

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JustinSoundxx
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Brogger system vs traditional

Post by JustinSoundxx » Mon Oct 19, 2009 6:18 pm

Hi, my names Justin Turner, im a flute student of Nina Perlove at Northern Kentucky University. I have been looking at buying a new flute. Nina has gotten me a Sankyo in to try that i have fallen in love with but im still looking.

I am currently playing on a Sonare 5000 and i am very frustrated with the key action and springs. As i was looking around i noticed the Brogger system on the Miyazawa flutes. I know that is a pinless system and im very intrigued by it. Do you know of any professionals that use a Brogger system flute, or has anyone played or own a flute with this type of pinless system on it?

not to get too much off topic, but im looking for a headjoint cut that produces a loud sound, good response on both high and low registers, and im looking for that "sizzle" type of sound when played. if you have any suggestions please let me know!

Thank you much!
Justin

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Oct 20, 2009 2:46 pm

Hi!

I'm sending you a PM.

asoalin
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Post by asoalin » Sat Sep 11, 2010 5:38 pm

I was wondering about the Brögger System as well. Anyone have opinions about it?
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." -Sergei Rachmaninoff

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Sat Sep 11, 2010 7:19 pm

I've tried the Brögger Mechanik on the Brannen flutes and the Brögger System on the Miyazawa flutes. Very similar in terms of feel. I think the Brannen version (adjusts with shims whereas the Miyazawa version adjusts with screws and is *slightly* different) is a bit smoother. But the Miyazawa version to me is a little more springy. Tomato, tomato, what's the difference?

::shrug::

Overall they seem to be really smooth and fluid. But you can get the same feeling out of flutes without them. It's just a matter of taste. I personally find them to be great on the Brannen flutes, and hit and miss on Miyazawa. Sometimes I like them on Miyazawa, sometimes I don't.

My three favorite flutes at NFA this year were a Nagahara, Miyazawa, and a Burkhart (the miya and burkhart tied). Only the Miya had the Brögger.

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cflutist
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Post by cflutist » Sun Sep 12, 2010 7:57 am

asoalin wrote:I was wondering about the Brögger System as well. Anyone have opinions about it?
I'll let you know in two weeks (fingers crossed) when I finally get my new Brannen that I have been waiting for since April.

I've been playing on a Haynes since 1972 so I don't have as much to compare to as FG 18 does.

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cflutist
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Post by cflutist » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:20 pm

cflutist wrote:
asoalin wrote:I was wondering about the Brögger System as well. Anyone have opinions about it?
I'll let you know in two weeks (fingers crossed) when I finally get my new Brannen that I have been waiting for since April.

I've been playing on a Haynes since 1972 so I don't have as much to compare to as FG 18 does.
After playing my Brannen flute for a few days I can say that I like the Brogger Mechanik very much. It has a very smooth, buttery feeling to it. Much better than my Haynes which is best described as "clanky".

asoalin
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Post by asoalin » Tue Sep 28, 2010 8:43 pm

cflutist wrote:After playing my Brannen flute for a few days I can say that I like the Brogger Mechanik very much. It has a very smooth, buttery feeling to it. Much better than my Haynes which is best described as "clanky".
Cool! Congrats on the new flute!! :D I'll let you know how the Miyazawa is when it gets here...looking like sometime next week :shock:
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music." -Sergei Rachmaninoff

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