Standard Solo/Etude Repertoire?

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deina-kun
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Standard Solo/Etude Repertoire?

Post by deina-kun » Sat Mar 03, 2007 11:37 am

I'm auditioning for a college in a few weeks and they're asking for two pieces from Standard Solo Repertoire or one from Standard Solo and one from Standard Etude Repertoire, but I have no idea what pieces they have. I emailed the Coordinator of Woodwind studies at the university, but s/he said that my private teacher would know about pieces that would fit on that repertoire.

I don't have a private teacher, though. :/

Here's the website with the info: https://my.fullerton.edu/MusicAudition/ ... sInfo.aspx

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Sat Mar 03, 2007 12:32 pm

standard repetoire sort of pieces are pieces like Mozart Concerto in G major/ D major, or Poem by Griffes, or Bach Sonatas, or Prokofiev sonatas, or Syrinx, or any piece in the Flute music by French Composers book.... just to name a few.....


As for Etudes... the Anderson etudes are fairly standard. the third movement of Bach's Partita in A minor [Sarabande] is a pretty standard etude piece.

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sidekicker
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Post by sidekicker » Sat Mar 03, 2007 12:57 pm

Fluteguy is correct. They are just asking auditioners to choose two pieces: both from the standard flute solo and/or etude repertoire.

Off the top of my head, to name some more: any Bach, Handel or Telemann (including the solo fantasies) sonata originally composed for flute and keyboard (unless originally composed for flute alone), Dutilleux Sonatine, Sancan Sonatine, Burton Sontina, Jolivet Chant de Linus, Poulenc Sonata, Piston Sonata, Bloch Suite Modale, Schubert Introduction and Variations, Martin Ballade, Reinecke Sonata, Hindemith Sonata, Copland Duo, Muczynski Sonata.

Etudes: Karg-Elert, Jean-Jean, any Andersen opus (as fluteguy said).

Good luck!

SK

ick27
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Post by ick27 » Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:57 am

You said this audition is in a few weeks, so pick out something you've worked up within the past year or so. I would not suggest trying to prepare a piece you've never played before in short amount of time. (Even if the piece you pick is a little less "standard".) Pick a piece you think you can play well, even if it isn't the most difficult piece you can play.

deina-kun
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Post by deina-kun » Sun Mar 04, 2007 5:10 pm

Anderson Op.41 or Op.33?

I've played a few of them in both books a while ago, so I have to look through them to see which one sounds good to audition with. ^^;

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MonikaFL
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Post by MonikaFL » Mon Mar 05, 2007 7:35 am

Deina, I think any of the Andersen studies would be fine... don't worry about which opus. Andersen is pretty standard etude repertoire.

If you decide to play two selections from flute repertoire, try to make them contrasting styles (i.e. lyrical, technical) and from different time periods.

If you can do two pieces rather than 1 piece and an etude, I'd choose that option.

What solo pieces have you worked on this past year or so, that you feel comfortable with?
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deina-kun
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Post by deina-kun » Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:13 pm

Mozart's Concerto in G is the piece I'm most comfortable with, but would I have to take a section of it since the audition is limited to 10 minutes?

I haven't played any Andersen studies in over a year, but I played through a few and I'm sure I can clean one up before the audition.

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MonikaFL
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Post by MonikaFL » Tue Mar 06, 2007 10:11 am

That's a great audition piece, definitely put the Mozart in there... if you put it last, they can just stop you when you've run out of time. It shouldn't be a big deal. :D
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Mar 06, 2007 12:06 pm

MonikaFL wrote:That's a great audition piece, definitely put the Mozart in there... if you put it last, they can just stop you when you've run out of time. It shouldn't be a big deal. :D
I second this. This was the piece I auditioned on, and got a scholarship for. If you only play an excerpt I would play bars 31[ where the flute starts] all the way through bar 91 [where the flute ends a long Enatural to F# trill].

My reasoning behind this portion, is because this is described as the 'intro' to the piece. This is the portion most often played in orchestral auditions [or so I have heard because I havent ever actually auditioned for an orchestra yet].

It is a good piece indeed.

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Post by deina-kun » Mon Mar 12, 2007 9:53 pm

Hi again! I've kind of gotten stuck with a little bit of a problem and I don't really know what to do. I currently play on a Gemeinhardt 3SB that I've had since freshman year, but I don't feel like it's helping me become any better a musician. In fact, I feel like it's making me worse and it's really hard for me to play some of the music I want to play which is really discouraging me.

I've been working on Concert in G, but when I'm cleaning and listening to intonation and playing through it, the tone is not how I like it (the upper registers always seem out of tune, especially with the two octave leaps) and it's really hard for me to play the sixteenth note runs that go up to the high notes. It feels like I'm putting too much energy just trying to get notes out of the instrument and there always seems to be some sort of delay on some of the notes which causes them to crack.

I don't think it's me and I'm pretty sure it's the instrument, but my mom likes to watch how her money is spent and she thinks I'm asking too much with wanting a new flute. (Because of this, I never had the opportunity to get private lessons.)

Is there anything I can possibly do to help me? I'll keep on being persistent with my mom, but that's about as much as I can do. The audition is two weeks away and at this rate, I feel as if I'm getting farther away from being able to clean my audition pieces everytime I practice on my flute. I don't think I'll be able to play the pieces I want to play with my flute restricting me. :[

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Mon Mar 12, 2007 10:21 pm

Well, intonation is up to the player for the most part. Flutists played for decades on flutes with much poorer scales than anything a Gemmie is likely to have, and managed to do so in tune. The scale on your Gemmie is probably not a good as it could be, but as long as you're flexible, it doesn't have to be for you to play in tune. Work with a tuner slowly through passages where intonation seems to be an issue for you. The cracking and issues with certain notes not speaking or not speaking on time could mean that your Gemmie needs some work (which would be a lot cheaper than buying a new instrument, and can make a substantial difference in how the flute plays). A good alternative to a whole new flute would be an upgraded headjoint (Gemmies are known for their somewhat unusual embouchure cut, which can limit you). This would save you a good deal of money, and assuming you found a head that worked well with you and the flute body it was to be matched with, could have most of the impact of a full upgrade.

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sidekicker
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Post by sidekicker » Tue Mar 13, 2007 8:10 am

deina-kun wrote:Is there anything I can possibly do to help me? I'll keep on being persistent with my mom, but that's about as much as I can do. The audition is two weeks away and at this rate, I feel as if I'm getting farther away from being able to clean my audition pieces everytime I practice on my flute. I don't think I'll be able to play the pieces I want to play with my flute restricting me. :[
If it is truly the instrument, and not you, is there any chance that you could borrow a better flute from someone you know just for the auditions? I know it may be a longshot, but if that's possible it may get you through the audition and buy you some time to either find a way to get a new flute or headjoint before you begin school.

It's not something I would suggest often because you really should be playing on the instrument you plan to bring to school with you (which is why I qualify this by assuming it is the flute and not you). But if your current flute is in disrepair or just not sturdy enough to handle the type of repertoire to the extent that your true musicianship cannot be judged, it may be appropriate in that instance to borrow an instrument so that it can. It may also convince your mother how much you really need something different.

Just a thought.

SK

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Mar 13, 2007 8:37 am

I would definately recommend getting it looked at. You could have leaks in you keys that are causing you difficulty, or if you havent ever had your headjoint cork replaced, it is probably high time to do so. Just the other day, I was asked to do some work on an intermediate Emerson flute [just readjust the keys, check for leaks etc. etc.]. Well, after adjusting the keys, I still wondered why it was so difficult to get notes to respond. So, I checked the positioning of the headjoint cork, and was going to push it in a little bit more.... the entire cork fell out. :shock: So, I did a quick fix to get them through spring break [applied cork grease to the existing cork to make a decent temporary seal], but I will be either installing a new one in the near future, or reuse the old one using a trick I learned out of James Phelan's [from Powell flutes] book about flute repair.

So, definately get your flute looked at by a technitian very soon.

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Post by MeLizzard » Tue Mar 13, 2007 8:16 pm

I'm not sure I'd recommmend buying a new flute so close to an audition. It would be worthwhile to have your current flute checked for any problems which could be greatly improved by repair or simple adjustments. Even a fantastic new flute will require an adjustment period, to learn about the flute's capabilities, response, and different scale. If you demonstrate potential and you're playing well, the auditor(s) will be aware of your abilities, regardless of your instrument, within reason. Good repair is essential, though. After playing Gemeinhardt during my younger years (high school and college), sometimes through great frustration, I can sympathize with your dilemma. Small tone potential and difficult scale are killers, but I think I would wait until after the audition and take my time trying new flutes, and avoid making a hasty decision. It's easy to be seduced by new flutes when almost all flutes sound better or are more responsive than our current model. Hang in there! :D
"There is no 'Try'; there is only 'Do'."--Yoda

auwon
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Post by auwon » Tue Mar 13, 2007 10:59 pm

i am also auditioning at csuf!! my audition is sunday april 25th and i am so nervous! i am actually a psychology major there right now and i have decided to change it to music.

have you talked to prof. ellis (cindy)? i remember i was very confused when i ran across the "standard repertoire" requirement...what the heck is included in it? i am performing one of bach's sonatas (1031 to be exact) and would reccomend any of his other sonatas for flute. i was also going to do faurie's fantasy for flute but it wasn't coming together the way i anticipated and time was running short...so i picked a piece called canzonetta by boisdeffre. i know this might be too late, but cindy reccomended any of the etudes from "Flute Solos from the Paris Conservatory; 1850-1920" you can order the book from www.fallshousepress.com (it might be nice to have to sight-read and to keep for other auditions!)

i wish you the best of luck!!! please let me know how you do on your audition and i will do the same! oh, and don't forget to practice your chromatic/major scales (legato and staccato)!

-auwon

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