Memorizing

Alternate Fingerings, Scales, Tone, Studies, etc.

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Kim
Posts: 109
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2004 9:02 am

Memorizing

Post by Kim » Sun Mar 21, 2004 2:09 pm

Do you use any certain method to aid you in memorizing songs
or etudes ? Or are you able to just memorize from playing them repeatedly ? Kim
[color=red] Music is the art of thinking with sounds.[/color]

FluteDiddy
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2003 4:32 pm

Memorizing

Post by FluteDiddy » Sun Mar 21, 2004 5:27 pm

Two hints from the Galway masterclass Take the piece apart
and understand how it is written Play in the dark, of course that requires some
memory already Other than that a lot of repitition and getting a feel for what
the music is about and how it sounds. Listening to recordings of the piece can
help as well. How is your daughter enjoying her new 561?
F-Diddy the Man with the Purple flute

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Kim
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Memorizing

Post by Kim » Sun Mar 21, 2004 5:33 pm

Thanks for the tips from the class. We weren't able to
watch it :( My daughter is really enjoying her 561. I think she loves it more
and more everyday. She has mentioned a number of times how much quicker the key
action is and we notice a big difference in tone quality also. Thanks for asking
:) Kim
[color=red] Music is the art of thinking with sounds.[/color]

FluteDiddy
Posts: 197
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Memorizing

Post by FluteDiddy » Sun Mar 21, 2004 5:39 pm

Someone told me once that the faster action is because the
new flutes are really clean compared to our old ones but I dont buy it being
that simple. Glad she is enjoying, did she get an EC headjoint? I forget if you
mentioned which one came with it.
F-Diddy the Man with the Purple flute

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Kim
Posts: 109
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Memorizing

Post by Kim » Sun Mar 21, 2004 6:18 pm

I agree I don't think it is quicker just because it is
cleaner. A couple of weeks ago she tried a Haynes that made in 1942 and the key
action was pretty nice on that for being an old flute in need of a cleaning. Her
flute came with the CY headjoint. I have read lots of opinions from people
comparing the 2 of them and they, just like flutes, really depend on the sound
the individual is after. Kim [quote] Someone told me once that the faster action
is because the new flutes are really clean compared to our old ones but I dont
buy it being that simple. Glad she is enjoying, did she get an EC headjoint? I
forget if you mentioned which one came with it. ---------------- [/quote]
[color=red] Music is the art of thinking with sounds.[/color]

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dancingflutist3000
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Joined: Sun Oct 12, 2003 9:35 am

Memorizing

Post by dancingflutist3000 » Sat May 01, 2004 7:53 pm

[quote] ---------------- On 3/21/2004 2:09:23 PM Do you use
any certain method to aid you in memorizing songs or etudes ? Or are you able to
just memorize from playing them repeatedly ? Kim ---------------- [/quote] Well
naturally just from playing something over and over again (for practice or
during band) you just start to memorize the fingerings, whether your trying to
or not. You can usually tell if your eyes stray from the music and you do not
stumble the notes. When I have to memorize scales I usually just play them over
and over. I really actually am memorizing the fingerings and not the notes. When
I memorize for marching band, I just memorize a part of the music first. First I
memorize say 4 measures. I do this by playing those measures and those measures
only. Then the next 4 or 5 (or 7 or 8 depending on the length of the song) until
I've memorized the whole song. I of course go back constantly to make sure I
still have my previous measures memorized [;)]
~*~Soccer
Rules~*~ ~*~dancingflutist~*~
http://thesims.ea.com/mysimpage/simpage.php?avatar_id=11412300

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embum79
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Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2003 11:55 pm

Memorizing

Post by embum79 » Tue May 04, 2004 8:20 pm

I agree with Flute Diddy about taking the music apart into
pieces (that sounds so destructive!!) [;)] I find it really difficult to
memorize a long piece of music. It is very mentally draining. At least for me..
some people seem to have a natural knack for it.
Cheers,
Emily

Cleartone
Posts: 63
Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 2:56 pm

Memorizing

Post by Cleartone » Sun May 09, 2004 4:17 am

Repitition, Repitition, Repitition. Start from the
beginning. play until you make a mistake and start over again. Put the piece
down for a few days. Start over again. it is dirty work but it must be done if
you want to play to your highest ability. as soon as you got it you will always
be able to come back to it. Compare it to learning a new language

sakuramimato
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2004 3:39 am

Memorizing

Post by sakuramimato » Sun May 09, 2004 1:22 pm

[http://music2master.com/lesson47.html] Has a couple of tips
on memorization. Like what Embum said, I think memorization just might be a
knack of mine since I enjoy doing it. With the school season coming to a close,
summer is coming up as well as the next field season -- another four to five
months of rigorous training after school, during school, and on the weekends.
Next year, my instructors are really getting down on the band, so we're only
allowed one week (possibly even two to three days) to memorize our music. Here
is a routine I used to memorizing the piece. (Depending on lenth of the song,
since you didn't state, these techniques are mainly for large ensemble bands on
a song spanning seven to ten minutes in length. I managed to memorize the song
in the a day, so this technique might prove useful, although memorization is
accomplished by different people in different ways. I suggest memorization
through techniques that are do-able by you and the most sufficient and
beneficial to your memorization.) 1. I listened to a recording of the three
different movements/parts of the show since they were all offered online thanks
to our composer. 2. I started without the music to get an idea of the song, its
style, theme, etc. After that, I got the director's score of the music and
followed the composition while listening to the show. It helped to figure out
where the parts fit, entrances, exits, where cues should be, corresponding
parts, related parts, runs, etc. 3. I marked changes in the music (key changes,
tempo changes, dynamic markings, articulation markings, time changes) to note
where they are since transitions in the music are one of the most important
things to take into consideration. 4. Divide the song(s) into different
sections. Usually, do it by transition (key, time, tempo, double bar). Also,
runs should also be memorized alone until they are memorized with perfection. 5.
Misc: Rhythm markings, additional dynamic markings before and after crescendos
and decrescendos, etc. Anything basic that is learned from musical annotation
and analysis. That's the end of the preparation stage. There's more, but this
is a condensed version. The rest is easy: 6. First run through the whole piece
to assure that you have the whole song under your fingers by sight. Doing this,
you will also have parts of the song memorized if you are able to play it on the
sheet with near perfection. Add musicality, as well. 7. Take the marked
individual segments and run through them with the sheets before playing without.
Be sure to add any dynamic contrast, articulations, etc. while playing with the
music and also without. 8. Pay more attention to runs that are difficult in
fingering, articulation, tempo, and memorization. 9. After having all the parts
memorized and put chronologically, play without the music, even if you don't
have the whole thing polished to perfection. This will show what parts you need
to focus on, etc. 10. Continue repeating the song through memory and adding
musicality, etc. There's more, but the memorization part is pretty easy if you
can play the song well with the music. It's just like playing a concert piece
for months day after day, and when you don't have the music, you can recall the
song just as if the sheet music were in front of you with all of the dynamic
markings, tempo markings, etc. I hope that helps, and good luck with
memorization!

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