My flute keys

Alternate Fingerings, Scales, Tone, Studies, etc.

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emmyx3
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My flute keys

Post by emmyx3 » Tue Sep 08, 2009 3:20 pm

My daughter is beginning to learn the flute on Sept. 21 and one of the keys are stuck( wont go up after i press them). It is a used flute I bought from a store. Can anyone help me please?

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pied_piper
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Post by pied_piper » Tue Sep 08, 2009 4:39 pm

If you bought it from a music store, take it back to them to fix it. If you bought it from a pawn shop or other non-music store, you still need to take it to a music repair shop.

There are a variety of reasons a key might stick down:
  • A spring has come off it's hook and needs to be put back in place
    A spring has broken
    The mechanism is rusted or needs oiling (Don't oil it yourself without knowing what you are doing - special oil is needed and you could cause other problems)
    The key or key shaft is bent
There are a few other reasons that a key might stick, but those are the most common problems. If you take it to a repair shop they should be able to quickly evaluate the problem and give you a free estimate of the repair costs.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

emmyx3
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:)

Post by emmyx3 » Sat Sep 12, 2009 8:11 am

ty so much! we are going to the music store tommorow (thx to you!) :D

MathWizard
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Post by MathWizard » Sun Sep 13, 2009 10:26 pm

Yes, Pied Piper is correct.

The most important thing to remember is to never try to fix something yourself without knowing exactly what you are doing. Doing things wrongs will lead to other problems. For example, you see that a spring is off, so you try to put it back, but in the process you break it.

Always bring it to a professional. A lot of times, band directors can help.
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Bo
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Post by Bo » Mon Sep 14, 2009 1:18 am

Used flutes need maintenance sometimes, but then they will work alright. Good luck with it!

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Zevang
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Post by Zevang » Mon Sep 14, 2009 6:46 pm

New flutes also need maintenance, so what about used ones?! :-)
A new flute will need at least a COA (Cleaning, Oil, Adjustment) every year, if it's used on a daily basis, assuming that the intention is to keep the instrument in perfect playing condition (precaution).
If you buy a used flute, first thing is sending it for a complete revision by a good technician. This is to avoid the sensation of being a bad flutist, when the problem in reality is the instrument per se. If it will be used intensively, better send it for COA every 6 months.

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Bo
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Post by Bo » Tue Sep 15, 2009 3:08 pm

Yes, of course new flutes need maintenance too... :) I meant used flutes need maintenance immediately, you can't just buy one and expect it to play perfectly...
By the way, my Yamaha manual (the one that mentions the mysterious tone reflector :roll: ) says to oil the keys every three months... Is it too much?

Bo

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Zevang
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Post by Zevang » Mon Sep 21, 2009 7:38 am

Not too much if you play 3 to 4 hours in a daily basis.
I would say 6 months is enough, at least once a year.
It also depends on the conditions of your location.
If you live in a dry place, the oil tends to "expire" more quickly. So three months could be a good idea.

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Bo
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Post by Bo » Mon Sep 21, 2009 1:56 pm

Thanks for the reply. :D

I think the golden mean (6 months) will be OK.

Maybe Yamaha Australia considers that Australia can be very dry, but I live by the sea, so 6 months should be enough.

Cheers,
Bo

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pied_piper
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Post by pied_piper » Mon Sep 21, 2009 2:26 pm

How close you are to the sea may influence your periodic maintenence. Salt water and the air near ocean locations can be particularly corrosive (RUST!) to steel and iron. Flute key shafts are typically made from steel (occasionally stainless steel).

I live about 20 miles from the ocean and oil once each year. Oiling once or twice each year should be fine, unless the keys actually get wet (playing outdoors in the rain?). If your flute ever gets really wet, it's not a bad idea to reapply some oil to drive out the moisture.
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

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Bo
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Post by Bo » Mon Sep 21, 2009 2:52 pm

I live pretty close to the ocean, something between 1/4 and 1/2 mile. I wouldn't play my new flute outside, the old flute will do. I really like to play at the beach, but it can be "dangerous" with the breeze if the sand gets into the keys...

Bo

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pied_piper
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Post by pied_piper » Mon Sep 21, 2009 6:35 pm

... or a sandblasted finish ... :shock:
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

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