B flat, flat?

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evrmre
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:22 am

B flat, flat?

Post by evrmre » Fri Jul 05, 2013 4:45 am

I was recently playing around with Sicilienne by Faure, and noticed a note (B) with two flat signs in front of it (bb). While I am aware that on a piano, this would be played as A, I tried experimenting to see if I could flatten the B flat, which I achieved by adding the G key to the B flat. The resulting sound seemed to fit the phrase better musically, so I got to wondering about the double flat thing: are we meant to assume the double flat means to drop to the next full tone, like a pianist would do, or was it intentional that we are trying to create a flattened flat? And for those who have played this piece, I wonder if you might try the phrase that starts with the double flat, with this fingering, and give an opinion (Or what fingering should be used if this is incorrect and there is a better one).

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Re: B flat, flat?

Post by fluteguy18 » Fri Jul 05, 2013 9:03 am

From the perspective of music theory double flats and double sharps are enharmonic to the semi-tone above or below. So yes, you should be playing A natural. The only reason it was notated as a double accidental is to satisfy the spellings of the chord structure in the passage.

evrmre
Posts: 99
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 2:22 am

Re: B flat, flat?

Post by evrmre » Fri Jul 05, 2013 7:48 pm

fluteguy18 wrote:From the perspective of music theory double flats and double sharps are enharmonic to the semi-tone above or below. So yes, you should be playing A natural. The only reason it was notated as a double accidental is to satisfy the spellings of the chord structure in the passage.
Many thanks. My theory isn't brilliant, so wasn't quite sure where to go with this one. :)

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