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newbie here

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bonefamily
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Wed May 11, 2011 6:11 am

Hello everyone. I'm not sure if this post should go here or in the Flute History, Instruments forum. I'm looking for advice on a first flute. I'm not new to music, and not new to wind instruments, just new to the traverse flute. I'm a 45 year old adult, and have been playing guitar (my main instrument) for over 30 years. I have also been playing recorders for about 10 years due to my love for early music. I have been wanting to learn both renaissance and baroque flute, but I feel that I should start with the modern boehm flute to get my feet wet with. I am not wanting to spend alot of money for a first flute, but I also believe in learning on a quality instrument so as not hinder learning. I am hoping you all can steer me in the right direction. I have considered renting, but I would really like to own my instrument. Thanks.
Bryan

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fingerbun
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Location: Sydney Australia

Re: newbie here

Postby fingerbun » Thu May 12, 2011 7:46 am

The safe option is probably Yamaha.

I'm in a similar boat to you and I am learning on an old Artley, which was cheaper, but a riskier choice (you get what you pay for). It has worked out ok for me.

Be wary of student level flutes that need major work, it may be cheaper to just buy a new flute.

YMMV. Enjoy.

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pied_piper
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Location: Virginia

Re: newbie here

Postby pied_piper » Thu May 12, 2011 10:36 am

Read our Flute FAQ for a lot of information about buying a flute.
http://www.fluteland.com/board/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=5859

It should answer most of your questions (and maybe make you think of a few more that you have not yet considered!)
"Never give a flute player a screwdriver."
--anonymous--

bonefamily
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Fri May 13, 2011 1:46 am

Thanks for the replies. I'll read through the link above...
Bryan

Gordon
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 7:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby Gordon » Fri May 13, 2011 6:44 am

Hello everyone. I'm not sure if this post should go here or in the Flute History, Instruments forum. I'm looking for advice on a first flute. I'm not new to music, and not new to wind instruments, just new to the traverse flute. I'm a 45 year old adult, and have been playing guitar (my main instrument) for over 30 years. I have also been playing recorders for about 10 years due to my love for early music. I have been wanting to learn both renaissance and baroque flute, but I feel that I should start with the modern boehm flute to get my feet wet with. I am not wanting to spend alot of money for a first flute, but I also believe in learning on a quality instrument so as not hinder learning. I am hoping you all can steer me in the right direction. I have considered renting, but I would really like to own my instrument. Thanks.
As someone who played the Boehm flute first, and then switched over to the wooden keyed and unkeyed flute (for Irish trad) and then, for a brief time, the Baroque flute - I thought I'd offer a slightly different point for consideration. The latter two types of flutes are both conical flutes, with slightly-to-very different fingerings from a Boehm system, depending on what key(s) you are playing in, or how many incidentals your flute music needs. They both use very different embouchure approaches, and (usually) have a very different embouchure cut from a modern flute. The Renaissance flute is cylindrical, like the Boehm, but is an entirely third beastie altogether.

In other words, the idea that you should start on a modern Boehm system flute to get your feet wet really only tracks if you want a basic feel for flutes in general, and will, in the end, probably stick with the modern flute. Switching over, later, to the other types of flutes is often a more difficult transition than starting on an early flute first - if early music, on early instruments - is your passion. Your personal mileage may, of course, vary.

Just a thought to keep in mind; otherwise, the advice given by others above, especially the buying tips FAQs, are great.

bonefamily
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Fri May 13, 2011 6:57 am

Thanks Gordon, your reply is very helpful. Yes, it is the early music love that I desire, as well as celtic music. Perhaps I should be looking for a simply system flute to begin with. I see that many an irish flute can be had for not too much $$$ (not to say that alot of $$$ can be spent on said flutes as well). I see that some cpvc simple flutes are very affordable (Doug Tipple) as well as some wooden flutes, such as the Sweetheart flutes. Can you recommend a more forgiving, better simple flute for a beginner? Thanks.
Bryan

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cflutist
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Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:44 pm

Re: newbie here

Postby cflutist » Fri May 13, 2011 8:52 am

Skip Healy and Casey Burns make some nice Irish and 6 hole flutes/fifes.

bonefamily
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Fri May 13, 2011 8:23 pm

Skip Healy and Casey Burns make some nice Irish and 6 hole flutes/fifes.
Thanks for the info. I'll look them up, but aren't those expensive flutes? I am on a mere budget, sadly...
Bryan

bonefamily
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Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Sat May 14, 2011 12:50 am

Skip Healy and Casey Burns make some nice Irish and 6 hole flutes/fifes.
Ok, just had a look - the Casey Burns Folk Flute is in my budget.....
Bryan

lianeandflute
Posts: 135
Joined: Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:19 am

Re: newbie here

Postby lianeandflute » Sat May 14, 2011 1:37 am

Pearl flute are also very, very good for student flutes. :) (boehm)
"It's happening inside you; not in the flute!" - Emmanuel Pahud (At a masterclass in Sydney, Nov. 2010)

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cflutist
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Re: newbie here

Postby cflutist » Sat May 14, 2011 8:17 am

Skip Healy and Casey Burns make some nice Irish and 6 hole flutes/fifes.
Ok, just had a look - the Casey Burns Folk Flute is in my budget.....
That is the flute that I have, but when I bought mine it, came in two sections instead of three. He was one of the few makers who made a "small handed" version as my fingers are pretty tiny and I found that I couldn't cover all the holes on other makers flutes. Thank god that open holed Boehm flutes have tiny holes :-)

Gordon
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Joined: Wed Dec 08, 2010 7:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby Gordon » Sat May 14, 2011 1:43 pm

I have lots of opinions about many makers, including Casey and Skip, (yes, they can be pricey, but about average for the better makers), and there are, as well, several superb Delrin and/or ebonite flute makers (such as M&E, keyed or unkeyed). I'd be glad to discuss my opinions of makers with you (I play a Hamilton, myself, and have for about 10 years), but - just like all the good advice given on this site about various silver/Boehm flute makes and models, one person's choice is not always the right one for every one. There are many early flute makers, too, some of which are outstanding... Aulos makes a decent PVC Grenser copy in 440, which is much cheaper than a wooden replica...

Your best bet would be checking out the flute forum over at Chiff and Fipple, which also includes a list of makers, and - of course - archives on topics similar to this... Hang out there awhile and ask question, as you did here...

Plus, you can check out The Irish Flute Store (google it - should come up), which sells used flutes from a very nice guy named Doc, at (often) affordable prices (and no maker's wait time!).

Good luck.

bonefamily
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Sat May 14, 2011 3:41 pm

That is the flute that I have, but when I bought mine it, came in two sections instead of three. He was one of the few makers who made a "small handed" version as my fingers are pretty tiny and I found that I couldn't cover all the holes on other makers flutes. Thank god that open holed Boehm flutes have tiny holes :-)
Thanks for the info. Do you find the Burns' Folk Flute to be that much easier in the hole spacing than other six hole D flutes?
Bryan

bonefamily
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 am

Re: newbie here

Postby bonefamily » Sat May 14, 2011 3:44 pm

I have lots of opinions about many makers, including Casey and Skip, (yes, they can be pricey, but about average for the better makers), and there are, as well, several superb Delrin and/or ebonite flute makers (such as M&E, keyed or unkeyed). I'd be glad to discuss my opinions of makers with you (I play a Hamilton, myself, and have for about 10 years), but - just like all the good advice given on this site about various silver/Boehm flute makes and models, one person's choice is not always the right one for every one. There are many early flute makers, too, some of which are outstanding... Aulos makes a decent PVC Grenser copy in 440, which is much cheaper than a wooden replica...

Your best bet would be checking out the flute forum over at Chiff and Fipple, which also includes a list of makers, and - of course - archives on topics similar to this... Hang out there awhile and ask question, as you did here...

Plus, you can check out The Irish Flute Store (google it - should come up), which sells used flutes from a very nice guy named Doc, at (often) affordable prices (and no maker's wait time!).

Good luck.
Thanks for the tip. I actually just bought a used Doug Tipple flute today from over there (Chiff and Fipple) for practically shipping charges :) It's a G flute, but will get my feet wet in simple system flute designs. It should be about the same size as my alto recorders.
Bryan

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cflutist
Posts: 447
Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 12:44 pm

Re: newbie here

Postby cflutist » Sat May 14, 2011 3:58 pm

That is the flute that I have, but when I bought mine it, came in two sections instead of three. He was one of the few makers who made a "small handed" version as my fingers are pretty tiny and I found that I couldn't cover all the holes on other makers flutes. Thank god that open holed Boehm flutes have tiny holes :-)
Thanks for the info. Do you find the Burns' Folk Flute to be that much easier in the hole spacing than other six hole D flutes?
For me yes, as I have small hands and small fingers (ring size 4). I had trouble covering some of the holes on the other makers flutes. It was not just the spacing but the size of the holes too.


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