Middle-aged flute player wannabees

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GerryG
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2002 1:01 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by GerryG » Thu Dec 04, 2003 2:45 pm

Hi, I played trumpet for 8 years in
grade school ('59 - '67) and high school and really loved it. All these years
I've missed playing in a band and always liked the idea of learning flute and
piccolo. About 1 year ago I bought a flute and a picc and have been teaching
myself as a hobby at home. At first I was very impatient and wanted to be "good"
in a couple weeks, but now that I've learned to be patient I'm finding things
are progressing well. I like to play along with a University of Illinois
Marching Illini CD and can now play many of the songs. The most challening thing
has been the sight reading because with trumpet you only play up to the A or C
above the staff. The notes in that upper above C are hard to determine (at least
when you're playing something with a quick temp). All I can say is it's great
and rewarding to play again after all these years. Maybe in another year I'll
join a community band. My goal is to play the solo in Stars and Stripes on the
piccolo. Gerry G

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by Penny » Thu Dec 04, 2003 3:22 pm

That cuts it! I will tell my
daughter to become an accountant and in 20 years return to the flute for
enjoyment! Don't listen to those accountant jokes, just tell them at least your
not a lawyer. When some of you spoke of not happy with the band experience, why?
Were any of you told that you would likely qualify for a college scholarship and
had a good chance of doing something with your flute playing? Or were you pretty
much just a member of the band as something fun to do? You have to admit very
few flute players make accountant money. Might as well buy lottery tickets as
pursue a career in music. A mediocre accountant makes a good living, an
outstanding flute player is likely to have to beg for a teaching job and lucky
to make 40K a year.

krichards
Posts: 71
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:49 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by krichards » Thu Dec 04, 2003 3:33 pm

Well, if telling your daughter you
want her to become an accountant doesn't totally scare her into becoming a
professional flute player, then I don't know what will work! But if telling her
you'd like her to become an accountant doesn't work, tell her you'd really,
really like her to become an actuary! [:p]

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Crazy
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2003 7:40 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by Crazy » Thu Dec 18, 2003 7:54 pm

I've been lurking in the background
reading everyone's hints until I saw this thread....I am a first time flute
player at the age of 36. I've wanted to play the flute since I was in high
school but my schools band teacher would not even let me try! My husband plays
the guitar(he hadn't played for 10 years and returned 4 years ago) & my son has
been taking drum lessons for 3 years now and doing very well in band class in
school. My husband bought me a flute (Gemeinhardt 2SP after returning a Jean
Baptiste FL-92S Flute since it wouldn't get in tune) a little over a month ago
without even knowing if I could play. I've been taking lessons and having a
ball learning. [:)] My instructor's thrilled with my progress and has had to
remind me a few times that I've only been playing a month. BTW Hello everyone.

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kdwflute
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2003 6:04 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by kdwflute » Fri Dec 19, 2003 12:52 am

Accountants know the best accounting
jokes don't they! Actually, I have met many people with very analytical jobs
that love music (scientists like my husband, mathematicians, you name it). There
are a lot of similar skills used! Music itself is wonderfully mathematical
(sorry - don't mean to scare anyone away!)
**************************************** Ha! I figure that the best defense for
jokes about accountants is a good offense. There was a reason I poked fun at
accountants...I am one too! I'm a CA (chartered accountant - that's what we
call them here in Canada). If you can't laugh at yourself, who can you laugh
at? ---------------- [/quote]

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kdwflute
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Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2003 6:04 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by kdwflute » Fri Dec 19, 2003 1:00 am

***************************** When
some of you spoke of not happy with the band experience, why?
***************************** It was really simple - the rules were to start in
beginning band. I had taken private piano lessons for years and Junior high band
was very remedial from the theory point of view. I wasn't patient enough to
wait days on end to get through the theory, and for the band teacher to work his
way around to each instrument for what amounted to about 10 minutes of group
instruction per instrument per class. I didn't persue private flute lessons
(although I'm sure I would have loved them) and just let it go. I also didn't
like the competition and performance (even in piano classes in college) which
were great fun, the required "recital" was something I dreaded. Music has always
been sort of a private thing I do for me. If my family overhears thats fine, but
its even hard for me to play if they are in a room watching! NOw I know that
sounds crazy since my job is to lecture to 175 students in a class at one time!
******************************* You have to admit very few flute players make
accountant money. Might as well buy lottery tickets as pursue a career in music.
A mediocre accountant makes a good living, an outstanding flute player is likely
to have to beg for a teaching job and lucky to make 40K a year.
******************************** Unless of course they become accounting
teachers . . . don't count your 401 K before it hatches! Kathy

Penny
Posts: 249
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 4:23 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by Penny » Fri Dec 19, 2003 1:02 pm

Speaking of Accountants,
mathematicians and scientists playing instruments. I read somewhere that because
of the part of the brain is the same to learn music and those type of math type
skills, they learn the basics and technical aspects of playing very well and
usually at an accelerated pace but rarely have the other creative part of the
brain wired in a way that will make them a good musician. Not necessarily my
opinion just what I read. Although I do admit it seems to fit the pattern pretty
well. Good Band student-Accountant-play for fun-Never get that good but play
well enough for enjoyment.[:bigsmile:]

krichards
Posts: 71
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2003 3:49 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by krichards » Fri Dec 19, 2003 3:05 pm

re: Good Band
student-Accountant-play for fun-Never get that good but play well enough for
enjoyment. While this may be true in many cases, let's not throw all
scientists/mathematicians/accountants into one pot please. Some of us are
blessed with very balanced left and right brains and make very good musicians,
both technically and artistically, and have very creative sides in many other
respects. Often times, career choices are based on the practical reality of
earning a good income, not necessarily based on one's area of greatest ability.
Honestly, I think I'm a better musician than I am an accountant. I've just
chosen to make my living doing the boring stuff! (OK, no jokes about "creative
accountants" now please!) While we're speaking of things we've read...I read
that both left and right brains work together best in people with very high
mental ability. [:praise:]

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by MattMom » Fri Dec 19, 2003 8:14 pm

Penny, I'm guessing you're a left
brained, linear thinking kind of person. Science and math are actually both
very, very, creative since they use problem solving skills, and a lot of
intuition. Therefore, these folks (Hey, that's me, geek programmer) often have
a LOT of feeling to put into their music. I also know people that are considered
excellent writers, and play extremely well technically, but their music has no
soul. I'd love to see the source of your article - sounds like bunk to me.
Also, the middleage wannabe's post is really a fun and encouraging one. Let's
try to keep it that way!

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fluteluversmom
Posts: 295
Joined: Sun May 11, 2003 10:22 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by fluteluversmom » Fri Dec 19, 2003 8:21 pm

Hi, I have a question for other
middle age players. How many of you are taking private lessons now as an older
player ? Who is playing/learning on their own ? I am not taking them as of right
now..but I am considering it in the future. Kim
Some
days you catch the bus and other days it runs over you.

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Crazy
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Dec 18, 2003 7:40 pm

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by Crazy » Fri Dec 19, 2003 10:09 pm

I'm taking private lessons. Five
weeks a ago I couldn't play a note or read music. After getting my flute I was
going to try to teach myself but realized quickly I needed help.

willi139
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:42 am

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by willi139 » Sun Dec 28, 2003 6:09 pm

AAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, dont listen to
ingnorance. Iam 32 years old, I started playing trombone in 6th grade for about
10 weeks until I almost beat the teacher with my horn. I was born with what we
all call now a learning disorder. at 13 started on guitar and like mozart
everyone in school hated me because I was a prodigy "how's the stupid kid play
so well" I cant read a lick of music but can play from ozzy to segovia and
compsed many pieces for my wife. In college I studied Speech language pathology
and mastered in Audiology. Iam also a proficient wood worker "I make guitars and
recently harps." I can do such a thing because I found out that I have what is
called the "edison trait" I recently was tested as having a 136 IQ.Yes Iam a
friggin genius and my best accoplishment to date other than knocking up my wife
is teaching. Iam a special ed teacher "I do believe I am probably the most
succssful teachers in New York" I have read extensivley on the brain, learning
and learning disorders, AND YES BRAIN MATURATION, I picked up the flute two days
ago and was surprised at the beatiful tones and how I could feel the resonat
frequencies in my hand, I quikley downloaded cannon in D and spectrum analysed
it so that I could practice getting the same tones and wallah. I feel confident
that if I keep blowing through this thing for a while I can be first chair in
any philharmonic I choose and would love to with my piecrcings and tatoos and
long hair. My point dont be discouraged by what lonely divorced un-happy people
say, and, No what Penny said was absoulutly rubbish and the statement about
puberty is also not true either. Anyone here wants to be a professional can, All
of you no exceptions, hell theres only 24 notes on this thing excluding flats
and sharps.oh and whom was it that invented the glass armonica wasnt it that
very un-creative ben franklin. Oh and I was a biker for a while hence the nasty
attitude I get

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by MattMom » Sun Dec 28, 2003 7:48 pm

Aaaaaaaaaahhhhhh, Welcome to the
Board, Willi! One of the things I completely love about music is that there is
room for everyone. I heartily agree with you that it's not uncommon for someone
with "Learning disabilities" can play with more feeling, intuition and even
expertise than the so-called "normal" kids. Yep, the quotes are deliberate - I
wish we could look at some of these issues as learning differences, rather than
disabilities. oh, there I go again, off on the soapbox. Anyway, welcome, have
some fun here! By and large, folks here are helpful and willing to share their
knowledge and experience. Hey, how the heck do you do a spectrum analysis on a
piece of music? THAT makes me very, very curious.

willi139
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2003 6:42 am

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by willi139 » Sun Dec 28, 2003 8:48 pm

ah yes my soap box also, the edison
trait is being researched in rochester it is trait that is characterized as
someone with a higher IQ that CANNOT learn in an average school environmentthis
is why youll find that the majority of geniuses are mechanics and Janitors. it
was named for Thomas Edison. So really it is a difference learning. Iam trying
now to get my school district to stop using "special education" and use the
phrase "Alternate Education" Spectrum Analysing is simple now adays if you dont
mind borrowing a program from Kazaa. you simply download the song and the
computer will visually analyse its contents you can then play into a mike and
analyse this also and compare the two. Its a fun way to learn when getting board
with scales. As a guitarist one of the most important thing my teacher taught me
was to play a note on the guitar and hold it over and over listening and feeling
it, this works so much better on the flute, "But drives My wife cats and unborn
baby nutz" Lessons to me arent all that important actually I find them
hindering, Even as a young guitarist my teacher after a year kicked me out
because he couldnt teach me anymore. I say play around listen to others play.and
dont use a mirror this is very counter productive. its one more scence for the
brain to try to interprit. your lips and diaphram will learn there placement
faster if you arent trying to visualize things, you want to feel it. I actually
took up the flute because theres a young man in that I work with whom is
autistic, we recently got him to try to play the flute, he really liked it but
when we went to the band office the teacher was kinda negitive and turned him
off. Iam now trying to undo what our wonderful educator did. Iam going to buy
him a very cheap flute and teach him myself. Sorry Iam rambling Iam also a bit
Obsessive complsive

MattMom
Posts: 60
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2003 10:29 am

Middle-aged flute player wannabees

Post by MattMom » Mon Dec 29, 2003 8:49 am

Since it sounds like you like to
work with your hands, and schools have no budget, have you considered messing
around with different PVC flutes for your students? There are a number of web
sites that give instructions on Irish Style and Native American style flutes.
With the Native flute, you can tune it to a pentatonic scale, which is found in
indigenous cultures world wide, and is very soothing to the human body. Message
or email me if you want some links. To all, my apologies for COMPLETELY
hijacking this thread!

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