Yamaha flutes

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Honeybee
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Yamaha flutes

Post by Honeybee » Fri Oct 12, 2007 4:06 am

i heard the yamaha 200/300 series are made in Indonesia and not worth buying. is this true?

bfloyd
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Re: Yamaha flutes

Post by bfloyd » Fri Oct 12, 2007 5:58 am

Honeybee wrote:i heard the yamaha 200/300 series are made in Indonesia and not worth buying. is this true?
I would say that it depends on the level it is being played at. Yamaha 200 series makes very nice student level flutes amd are much recommended. I've read the 300 series are pretty much the same as the 200 series and if you want to move up from the 200 series to go into the 400's.

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vandoren
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Re: Yamaha flutes

Post by vandoren » Fri Oct 12, 2007 8:03 am

Honeybee wrote:i heard the yamaha 200/300 series are made in Indonesia and not worth buying. is this true?
This is one of these broad rubbish statements and is an insult to both Yamaha and Indonesia. Yamaha, like very many Japanese manufacturers, has superb Quality Control ethics and can deliver quality work from plants anywhere in the World. I have an Indonesian Yamaha 211 and it is a superb starter flute and is up there with the earlier ones made in Japan.
IanR..................

.............still trying to become a musician at 66 years of age !

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flutepicc06
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Re: Yamaha flutes

Post by flutepicc06 » Fri Oct 12, 2007 9:19 am

bfloyd wrote: I've read the 300 series are pretty much the same as the 200 series and if you want to move up from the 200 series to go into the 400's.
It is true that they're essentially the same, however, this holds true for the 200's and the 400's as well. Once again the only difference is more silver (and possibly open holes or a B foot). If you really want to get a flute that will play differently than the 200's without leaving Yamaha, you'll need to go for a least a 500 series instrument.

Back to the original question, though....I could not agree more with Vandoren. Where an instrument is built matters not at all so long as it is of good quality and comes from a reputable maker. Yamahas are some of the best student flutes around (albeit some of the most expensive too), so to claim they're not worth buying based on something that matters so little as their nation of origin is ridiculous.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Fri Oct 12, 2007 1:17 pm

The only concerns that I would have about the location of manufacture, are based off of the specifications of the instruments themselves. Many companies base miniscule details put into the construction by determining the specific geographic market that the flute will be sold in.

This is not to say that they make flutes of higher/lower standards of manufacture base off of the country they are going to, but rather what is most popular in that area. Example: Statistically I have heard that stainless steel springs are more popular in Europe whereas white gold springs are more popular in america. I do not know for sure whether this is true or not, but it does bring to light the fact that companies do take into account the preferances of different geographic locations.

So, sometimes rumors like these may have roots in experiances when individuals have bought flutes through a foreign market [probably to save money], and some of the specifications were not to their liking. This is not to say that any of these are inferior, but rather that they are merely different.

An experiance I have had of this, was when I bought my piccolo. I bought my Yamaha YPC-62 [all wood with nickel silver keys] through a dealer in Holland. I test played several yamaha piccs to be sold in America, to an American market, and I specifically noticed a difference in spring tension. My picc [bought in Holland] had marginally more spring tension than those I test played that were intended for an American market. This is not neccessarily a bad thing [it takes slightly more force to close the keys, but when pressure is released, they practically jump off of the toneholes... which I have grown to like making quick passages a breeze].

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Fri Oct 12, 2007 1:53 pm

Also keep in mind that many flutes are marketed as "like Yamaha" orother mainstream company. That is another way misconceptions get out about different flutes.

sinebar
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Re: Yamaha flutes

Post by sinebar » Fri Oct 12, 2007 5:30 pm

Honeybee wrote:i heard the yamaha 200/300 series are made in Indonesia and not worth buying. is this true?
I have a Yamaha 381 and it was assembled in the USA. States it right on the flute. I don't know where the parts are made. I have had it for 10 months and it has been a very good flute. I can assure you that you will not go wrong with yamaha.

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flutepicc06
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Re: Yamaha flutes

Post by flutepicc06 » Fri Oct 12, 2007 5:43 pm

sinebar wrote:
Honeybee wrote:i heard the yamaha 200/300 series are made in Indonesia and not worth buying. is this true?
I have a Yamaha 381 and it was assembled in the USA. States it right on the flute. I don't know where the parts are made.
That's another important issue here. Most flutes below the custom level (yes, even the ones traditionally associated with America) are at least partially manufactured in Asia or other parts of the world than where the company is based. So long as quality is not compromised by sending the work overseas, this isn't an issue (in fact, it saves us money by saving them on labor costs).

bfloyd
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Post by bfloyd » Fri Oct 12, 2007 6:08 pm

Just to add, being new to the flute world and all; I have played many violins that are made in China to play, and are built better, than some of those made in America. I would not knock any instrument just because it is made overseas. As long as the quality control is being used, you will get a quality product.

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Sat Oct 13, 2007 8:01 am

Unfortunately, that has not been the case in past years with flutes. I truly believe that manufacturers are getting better with quality control, but traditionally, flutes made in China have been plagued with a lot of problems, hence the reason why many people avoid them altogether. I would rather play test a flute over several months before making a decission.

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Buttercup
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Post by Buttercup » Sat Oct 13, 2007 1:40 pm

I had Yamaha flutes all my student life and had no problems with them. They are hard-wearing and reliable, I have nothing bad to say about them. Best thing is to talk to a repair person- they see the unreliable flutes more often than the good ones

brina
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Post by brina » Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:16 pm

i don't know if that's true, but if you are a beginner this flute is the best for you. but if you want a better flute that will last, DON'T buy yamaha 200-300 series. i have to yamahas 200 series and they are both not good.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:21 pm

I have to disagree with you, Brina. Yamahas are certainly excellent flutes for students (and some pros play them too), but whether they're the "best" for beginners is highly debatable. As for not buying the 200 or 300 series, I disagree completely with that. I have a 221 that's lasted me for nearly 10 years without a service and is still going strong. Yamahas are among the most reliable flutes available. I would not recommend a 300, as it's just a glorified 200 (with a significantly inflated price tag) as I mentioned above, but there's nothing wrong with them if you were to buy them...They're certainly much better than a lot of student level flutes on the market.

brina
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Post by brina » Sat Nov 10, 2007 7:51 pm

everyone has other experience. I don't like them. Their headjoints ( 200 series) are horrible. I bought a new one and it's completely different. My first Yamaha lasted 6 years and I have a new one about three years now. The professor from a music academy told me that I can't come to audition with Yamaha 271. But, as I said, for beginners is the best flute that you can get for a normal price.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Sat Nov 10, 2007 9:21 pm

brina wrote:everyone has other experience. I don't like them
And you're certainly entitled to your opinion, but they're very good (and very reliable) flutes, and whether or not you care for them, they are well made flutes that serve many people for a long time. There's nothing wrong with the cut of the 200 series Yamaha...In fact, it's the same cut that every modern Yamaha in the 200, 300, and 400 series has (the machine made CY cut). They're designed to be easy to produce a reliable sound on so that beginners don't get frustrated, and as such are limited in their capabilities, but they're certainly no worse (and in some cases are much better) than some heads on student flutes.
But, as I said, for beginners is the best flute that you can get for a normal price.
They're good flutes for beginners, but not the best, as even at the beginner level there is no definitive "best". Any decent quality flute in good working order is fine for a beginner, and Yamahas can be quite pricey. If a beginner has a limited budget, there's nothing wrong with a Jupiter, Gemeinhardt, Emerson, etc.

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