Flute Upgrade

For Anything and Everything to do with Flute Playing and Music

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Isabelle
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:35 pm
Location: Missouri

Flute Upgrade

Post by Isabelle »

Ok, I've had my Student Model Gemeinhardt flute for 5 years and I think it's time for an upgrade... I know what I want in one and I'm looking at a couple different Models but I want to know what everyone else thinks:

Jupiter 511RBSE
-silver plated
-French/open holed
-Offset G
-Split E Mech.
-B footjoint

Jupiter 511RBSO
-Silver plated
-french/open holed
-offset G
-B footjoint

Emerson EF6
-Silver Plated
-French/Open holed
-inline G
-B footjoint
-undercut tone holes

Emerson EF6OF
-Silver plated
-silver lip plate and riser
-french/open holed
-offset G
-C footjoint
-undercut tone holes

Pearl PF-505RB
-Silver Plated
-French/open holed
-inline G
-B footjoint
pointed Key arms

Yamaha YFL-261
-Silver PLated
-French/open holed
-offset G
-B footjoint


If anyone elae has any suggestions, I would appreceate it...I would like offset G key, Open holed, preferably B footjoint, and No nickel plating...I'm allergic, and I don't want to pay more than 1,100 on a new one

THANKS!!
"I can only say so much about how I feel. Music is what I always turned to when I was feeling a certain way. It's been my reason for everything."
~Josh Groban~

fluttiegurl
Posts: 882
Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Post by fluttiegurl »

Some other suggestions in your price renge:

Pearl 665 RBE (no CODA) - I found this flute to be a bit more substantial than the 505. However, this should most definately be your call.

Yamaha 381

Azumi 2000 series

Trevor James Cantabile

The flutes you have listed are all good as well. Jupiters don't do much for me, but that is a personal issue. I just thought I would throw in a few more to consider. Depending on what kind of upgrade you are wanting to make, you may want to consider going up a level on each of these. In most cases, that still puts you at around $1000.

Just be sure to play all of these before making your final decission. You may be surpised with some, disappointed with others, but sure that it is the right lfute for you.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

Also, I would recommend taking a look at some used flutes in that price range. Even though it is quite nice to say I got a "new" flute, sometimes due to budget issues, sticking to only new flutes can inhibit your potential progress in the future.

So, I would recommend looking at some higher level 'intermediate' used models, and consider just having a tech adjust and do a thorough cleaning to give it that 'new' look.

As for new flutes, I would also give the Armstrong 303b or the 800 series a shot. It is really a sturdy instrument, and the heads are pretty flexible in relation to other instruments I have tried in the same price range. The specs for this instrument is a solid silver head, plated body and foot, open holes, and b footjoint. However, most with this exact model number have an inline G, but I am sure that there are some with similiar model numbers that have the offset. They all usually come with the same type of head.

But keep in mind that I played an intermediate line armstrong for 4 years before upgrading to a handmade flute, therefore, I am inclined to be slightly biased in favor of this company. While it served me very well, and is still a very solid and quite good instrument, I personally outgrew it. It is an instrument that like any well made intermediate level flute would serve many individuals for the majority of their playing career.

Make sure that you read up as much as you can on flute stuff in general [like the FAQ thread on here, and the maker's webpage]. Try everything before making a decision.
Last edited by fluteguy18 on Wed Mar 28, 2007 1:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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atoriphile
Posts: 155
Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 2:35 pm
Location: Washington, DC

Post by atoriphile »

Isabelle -

All of the flutes you listed are student flutes along the same lines as your current Gemeinhardt.

What is the reason for the upgrade?

Is your current flute holding back your progress? If so, any of the flutes you listed probably wouldn't help. You would need a higher level intermediate flute instead, as was mentioned by others.

Or do you currently have a closed hole flute and just want to "upgrade" to an open hole flute instead? If this is the only reason for upgrading, I would recommend against doing so.

I agree with the other posters that if you want a true upgrade but have a budget of 1,100 (U.S. dollars? pounds? euros?) then you should look at a good condition used flute instead of buying a new one.

Good luck with your search!

FLflutist
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Location: North Port Florida
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Post by FLflutist »

If you're going for an upgrade you should probably go for solid silver, not silver plated. Or at least a solid silver headjoint....

That's just my opinion in the least. It depends on what you're exactly looking for in an upgrade.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

FLflutist wrote:If you're going for an upgrade you should probably go for solid silver, not silver plated. Or at least a solid silver headjoint....

That's just my opinion in the least. It depends on what you're exactly looking for in an upgrade.
Solid silver doesnt neccessarily mean that it is better.

Despite many myths being spouted by the mouths of mass flute makers, the material of the flute isnt nearly as important as the engineering that goes into making it. There is little to no evidence to say that gold, silver and platinum actually sound different, because usually instruments made of those materials often have hand cut headjoints. Thus, not every cut [even within the same design] is the same even though they may all have the same design name engraved or stamped into the tube. So, because there are so many variables, it is almost impossible to definitively say that gold sounds different than silver.

But, there is a difference in the feel of the playing qualities. Silver FEELS different than gold to the player playing the instrument. Often times, this myth that solid silver is definately better than silver plated, is because usually when a maker uses a more precious metal, the maker takes more care crafting the instrument.

So, if it is a reputable maker, often times, a silver plated instrument is just as good as a solid silver instrument [ I have actually played a few plated instruments that blew some rather nice solid silver instruments out of the water].

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

Jupiter 511

Dont even waste your time with upgrading to this model Except for the head joint, there really is not much difference between this one and the one you have already. If you go with a Jupiter, the step up would be a 711 model.

Emerson EF6
This is a student model open hole with a B foot

Pearl PF-505
Student model with an open hole and a B foot.

Yamaha YFL-261
Student model with an open hole and a B foot.


For the price range, you could spend a few more dollars and get a Pearl 665 that you can get open hole, B foot, and your offest G. Here is an example. You can find these for $1000, and get your moneys worth.

http://www.pearlflutes.com/html/quantz_series.html

If you can squeeze a little more money, you can look at the Jupiter 711 or a Yamaha 400 series.

I hope this helps.

Phineas

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

take a look at fluteworld.com and you can get almost any model flute with a decent discount, and therefore would get much more bang for your buck.

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Isabelle
Posts: 19
Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:35 pm
Location: Missouri

Post by Isabelle »

Thanks for the Advice and ideas, everyone, But I got a new idea...I'm thinking about getting an oboe instead and learining how to play that. My music teacher likes this Idea. Does anyone know anything about oboes, what I should look for in one, etc? Anyhting will help me. I probebly won't get one(if I get one) untill this summer when the used ones come into my local music store.
"I can only say so much about how I feel. Music is what I always turned to when I was feeling a certain way. It's been my reason for everything."
~Josh Groban~

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

If you still want to keep flute as your primary instrument, then I would be very cautious about learning oboe. The embouchure is a lot more firm than flute embouchure, and it could [and probably will] affect your flute sound and playing. So, be careful about this.

If you think you would like the oboe better than flute, then go for it! There are far too few oboe players in the world! Do what makes you happy. But if you still want to play flute primarily, then I would think this through very carefully. If you had to pick any double reed instrument to play as a second instrument, I think bassoon would be best [embouchure isnt as firm I think and would make an easier transition from flute to bassoon].

Good luck with wherever your decision takes you! :D

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Isabelle
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Joined: Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:35 pm
Location: Missouri

Post by Isabelle »

I seriously don't know what I want to do....I love playing the flute, I would Love to get a new one, but I want to learn a different instrument too...it's funny... even the thought Of learning the French Horn has popped into my head...It's such a beautiful sounding instrument....mabie the piccolo....perhaps....and if I played the oboe i could really change the sound of my school's very modest band(we're talking 16 people)....I don't know....gahhhh....i need to think about this....I wish I could just do everything and not have to choose.... haha....welllll, I think I'm gonna go....and sleep on this....night
"I can only say so much about how I feel. Music is what I always turned to when I was feeling a certain way. It's been my reason for everything."
~Josh Groban~

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 »

if you are 100% sure you want to learn a new instrument, of those you mentioned, I recommend piccolo. Even though most of the fingerings are the same, and the embouchure is similiar it is still a whole new beast to tame. And, the embouchure shouldnt mess with your flute embouchure that badly.

Although, if you do decide to go with picc, and end up playing it for several months in a row without playing your flute.... :shock: I did that once and it was aweful. I could play the picc but not the flute.... very embarrasing as first chair. But after a few minutes I got back in the hang of it.

But just remember, do what you want to do. This is my personal recommendation, but if you feel that you would be happy going in a different direction, then by all means go in a different direction. My opinion is that as long as you at least appreciate the flute [and not neccessarily play it] then you are qualified to contribute to, and are more than welcome on this board. It doesnt matter what instrument you play, but rather that you DO play or that you DO appreciate music. So, just go in whatever artistic direction you feel suits you. I am not one to dictate what you play as a musician, and variety in this world is what makes life interesting.

fluttiegurl
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Joined: Fri Dec 10, 2004 11:05 pm

Post by fluttiegurl »

I know several people who double on both flute and oboe professionally. The key is to put time into both instruments and treat them as different instruments, not trying to group them into one (if that makes any sense). If you truly want to play oboe and there is a plce in your program for it, go for it! Just keep playing your flute on a regular basis and you should do fine. In college, it is very common for students to learn a large variety of instruments for teaching and for doubling in different situations.

As for what is a good oboe, I highly recommend Yamaha (I think the beginner instrument is model 211). Buffet also makes good oboes, as does Loree (I think that is how it is spelled, it has been a while).

One word of caution, oboes are expensive and even the plastic beginners are often as much as a good flute. Wooden ones tend to crack if not cared for properly, so learn the instrument care procedures. Also, just as with flutes, there is a lot of junk floating around out there, so be careful.

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