Question about Pearls

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deina-kun
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 8:06 pm

Post by deina-kun » Sun Mar 18, 2007 10:39 pm

Thank you, fluttiegurl and fluteguy18!

I have an offer to get a Dolce with the split-E around as much as the CODAs are worth and your replies helped a lot. Now all I have to worry about is getting to a dealer sometime to play test them. :D

Are handmade flutes superior to the factory made ones? [And in what ways?] I've read from few places that handmade models are more along the lines of the professional standard.

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flutepicc06
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Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 11:34 pm

Post by flutepicc06 » Sun Mar 18, 2007 10:48 pm

Handmade flutes absolutely are superior to factory made ones in terms of quality and workmanship, but that doesn't mean that they suit every need. The level of human involvement in the production of an instrument is what determines whether it's machine made or handmade, and the differences usually are clear when you play such instruments. Handmade instruments usually have a hand cut headjoint that may offer more colors, a faster response, a different tone, etc than a machine made head of the same specs, while the bodies generally will have a smoother mechanism. I make a distinction between "handmade/professional" flutes (which involve at least some hand work, but may retain some machine building), and "custom built flutes" which are fully hand built one flute at a time, and are generally ordered by the customer to match a specific list of specifications. What flute(s) one owns largely depends on their needs as a player, so someone can own an artist level instrument without being a major recording artist, or such a player may own a student instrument for use outside, etc.

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woof
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Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 8:06 am
Location: North East US

bent keys

Post by woof » Mon Mar 19, 2007 6:03 am

Thanks fluttiegurl and flutepicc. I am always super careful in handling the flute but was hoping the keys were stronger than they looked. The great fear for me is dropping the flute or to much pressure on the b key. The b key and G do look especially vulnerable because of their length. I think on the Elegante that I play the keys are brass(?) coated with silver? Are there particular keys that tend to get bent most often?

As to the question on the Pearl Elegante posted by deina-kun I have an Elegante and really do like it. I will say the headjoint is very responsive, quick, and "bright". One thing that impressed me was how easy it was to reach C4 but C1/B1 I still have some trouble with getting on a reliable basis. The quick response of the headjoint is like driving a ferrai (in my imagination) it is easy to overdrive or in the case of the flute overblow so that quick responsiveness require finess (of which I have much to learn). As others have said, play the flutes your are interested in side by side if possible. I really recommend having them sent to your house if possible so you can spend some real time with them. Play them in small rooms, big rooms, record what you sound like and play it back etc. Anything that helps you make a choice you will be happy with.

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flutepicc06
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Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 11:34 pm

Re: bent keys

Post by flutepicc06 » Mon Mar 19, 2007 1:52 pm

woof wrote: I think on the Elegante that I play the keys are brass(?) coated with silver? Are there particular keys that tend to get bent most often?
That's probably nickel-silver (Maillecort) that's been nickel plated. Keys don't often get bent on instruments that are well taken care of, but the G# is certainly the most likely. The trills and C# key can also be bent pretty easily because of their longer rods and smaller sealing surface. Footjoint keys' being bent isn't unusual either.

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