Question about Pearls

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sakuramimato
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Question about Pearls

Post by sakuramimato » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:10 pm

Which of the models are handmade?

I'm not sure if the Quantz series is handmade since it doesn't say on the site. And is the CODA version of the Quantz, Dolce, and Elegante worth looking into?

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:30 pm

The Quantz series is not handmade. You should also know that they are not made in Japan as the higher models are. I do not feel that this has effected the quality, but it is something to know. Up until a few years ago, the Elegante series and up were handmade. I am not sure about the current Elegante models.

I have students who play Pearl Quantz flutes with and without the CODA. I personally do not think it is worth the money, but again, I have students who have made the extra investment. What I have found is that the CODA does add a little more weight to the flute, I assume sue to the C# trill key.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:42 pm

Personally I think the CODA version is a good deal, and I would recommend it if at all possible (assuming you like how the flute plays). You get both the C# trill and a D# roller (possibly more, but these are the 2 main upgrades I remember off the top of my head) for about $500 (a C# trill alone may cost 7 or 8 hundred), and both are highly useful. Weight is a consideration, however, so if you have weak arms or a previous injury, you may seek to reduce the weight by opting away from the CODA version.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Jan 23, 2007 10:54 pm

As for handmade construction.... I believe it starts with the Elegante model and higher.... but I am not 100% sure about that.... I do know that the Cantabile [ next model up I believe] is completely handmade.

On the subject of the CODA.... I think it would be a good investment if you were going to be a Music Education major who didnt necc. want to play their instrument as part of their career. It gives options on an upper end intermediate instrument that usually arent offered until you encounter handmade models. But, it would be a good instrument [if you liked the way it played] I believe for an aspiring high school student who would like to be a Performance major in college, who would be upgrading while earning thier degree to a completely handmade instrument. This way, as they [both sets of people] are encountering more advanced music, they will have the extra gadgets at hand to simplify things.

Of course, budgeting must be kept in mind, and one's goals must be decided somewhat before purchasing an instrument. So, I think it is an all around good deal [because you never know what sort of music you will run into], but it really depends on your situation and what you want to get out of it. If someone was only going to upgrade, and only play as an adult amatuer [just for a hobby], then I would recommend it, but would make quite clear, that for thier purposes, they probably wont need the extra options, so the investment may not be worth it for them.

Just my .02

sakuramimato
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Post by sakuramimato » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:03 pm

Another question..

I've been playing inline G for the past four years, but I've been wondering about the Split E mechanism, especially since most flutes with that option come with the offset G. I don't really have much of a preference between offset and inline G, but what benefits does the Split E offer and why do most flutes have to have the G offset in order to have that option?

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:27 pm

sakuramimato wrote:Another question..

I've been playing inline G for the past four years, but I've been wondering about the Split E mechanism, especially since most flutes with that option come with the offset G. I don't really have much of a preference between offset and inline G, but what benefits does the Split E offer and why do most flutes have to have the G offset in order to have that option?
Well, there are several ways to construct a Split E, but in combination with an Inline G, it can cause the mechanism to bind, which is why most flutes with the Split E are offset (though you some are Inline). The Split will allow a more stable E3 and make it easier to go from A3 to E3 without cracking by reducing venting when E3 is fingered, but can affect trills negatively (unless you have an on/off clutch for it). There's also the option of a High E Facilitator/donut/NEL/cat's eye/G donut which will do the same thing without complicating the mechanism (which means no negative effect on trills and no additional potential for binding), but may slightly flatten A3. It's also considerably cheaper and can be installed and removed at any point, while the Split E is permanent. Personally I feel no need for either and have never bought a flute with either, but if you have special difficulty with E3 cracking, it may be useful to you.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:19 am

Now I see fluttiegirls' point.... it really depends on the level of the player, and most people wont ever need those options if they are only looking to step up from a student flute in high school.

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Wed Jan 24, 2007 9:45 am

Yes. That is what I was getting at. Most of my students who play the Pearls eventually upgrade to a handmade by college, so that is somewhat of a waste, especially since the C# trill (for instance) is usually the first option they drop when looking for a more expensive instrument and when housands of dollars are on the line, so it really has not done a great deal of good to have learned to use it. As for this being a good deal, maybe for some. The headjoint on the CODA seems to be a little stiff for some players as well, due to the gold riser I assume, but I am not sure that the current CODA models have a gold riser. They may just have a gold lip plate now. Players considering this flute (and any other) should play both models. That is the only way to tell if an individual will like it.

The added options are the C# trill, D# roller and a solid gold lip plate (this did at one time include a gold riser, but I do not see that option listed anywhere now). The roller is, for me that is, pretty much useless since it tends to stick on the flutes that I have seen. Most players never really need this anyway. The gold lip plate does very little, if anything. The C# trill is probably the most useful option, but how many players would use it if they had it? Granted, it has several useful applications but the average player would not know these applications. Again, this is just my opinion.

As for split E, be aware that the split can cause some alternate fingerings to not work and it may effect intonation in some of the notes in the upper register (I believe this has been addressed). This also adds more weight (if that is a consideration). The biggest issue I have seen is that the split E can create adjustment issues, especially as the pads wear. This is the most common problem I see. In some cases, this can be quite severe. However, if you like the option, the split E does work wonders with the high E, exactly what it is designed to do.

remnantpark
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Post by remnantpark » Wed Jan 24, 2007 2:46 pm

Since you guys brought up the topic of Pearl flutes. I have a question...
i'm looking for intermediate flutes (played for 4 years), do you know what kind of pearl flute is good for intermediates. I'm used to inline G & openhole.
And What is this "Quantz", "Coda", "elegante", etc...I don't get it :?:

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 3:24 pm

remnantpark wrote:Since you guys brought up the topic of Pearl flutes. I have a question...
i'm looking for intermediate flutes (played for 4 years), do you know what kind of pearl flute is good for intermediates. I'm used to inline G & openhole.
And What is this "Quantz", "Coda", "elegante", etc...I don't get it :?:
They're the different models Pearl offers. Rather than model numbers (Yamaha uses 647, 221, 381, etc to denote the various levels of flute they offer), they use names (Quantz, Elegante, etc). Other companies do this too (Trevor James comes to mind).

sakuramimato
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Post by sakuramimato » Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:14 pm

I don't think E3 is too hard for me to play. The complaints I have with my current flute is that some of the notes E3 and up (especially Ab, F#, and B3-C4) are very airy and it's not appealing to listen to. I can hit the notes just fine, but half the time it's just a battle to get a good tone from them. The flute's kind of worn since I had it for four years (Gemeinhardt 3B), so it's not playing like it used to anymore.

For my future plans, I was thinking of minoring in Music performance on the flute, and after college just play as a hobby. This upgrade will probably be my last, since I don't plan on going professional after college. I'll probably be leaning toward choosing between the Dolce and Elegante series since I'd like to go to college this fall with a handmade. :]

Recently, has there been talk of the quality of the Pearl flutes? I remember reading before that they had some trouble with quality in the past. How have the flutes Pearl has been making been reviewed? And what are your opinions on the Dolce and Elegante flutes? Also, I heard some flute technicians charge extra for Pearls because of the pinless mechanism. Is that true? And where would one look for a repairman for a Pearl or any professional flute technicians? (Preferably in Southern California.. I've been referred to Paul Rabinov, Cynthia Kelley, and Ogura Flute Works.)

flutegeek1992
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Post by flutegeek1992 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:10 pm

Hello, I'm so glad you asked this question. I'm a 9th grader who plans to become a performance major in college, and I have a pearl 765 Quantz Coda.

The CODA package includes: a split E, a d# roller, solid gold lip plate and riser, and a c# trill. I think I covered them all.

A split E key helps make E3 clearer and speak easier. I love mine to death! A D# roller helps you when your going from C1 and C#1 to Eflat1. It takes the place of the sly "nose oil" method. The solid gold lip plate and riser are pretty self explanitary. The c# trill is also self explanitary.

I love my Pearl 765 Quantz CODA for many reasons. It was what I needed to get me through high school and (hopefully!) college, for a smaller budgets then other models I was considering. I plan on advancing to a totally handmade flute my senior year of college. I feel that this is a truely good deal, and wonderful if you like pearls. However, don't just buy something because its a good deal--you want to be happy with your purchase and love it. Don't get something you don't love. My teacher always tells me that when you try a new flute, you should know automatically if its for you. Also consider trading around headjoints with your Pearl. I had to try three or four to find what I wanted, all within the same model number. You may opt to go for a different model headjoint (this is great to do at a convention).

All in all, its your choice. Try around, and find what YOU love.

fluttiegurl
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Post by fluttiegurl » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:42 pm

Very true. It is all about choice!

As for the split E option, I would try both. To be very honest, a better quality flute may work wonders even without the split E.

The quality of Pearl flutes has been very good in the last several years. Quality control seems to be great. It is true that some techs charge more to work on Pearls, but that shouls not be a deciding factor if you truly like the flute after trying it against other flutes. By the way, please do make sure you try other flutes. Also, I am not 100% sure that the current Dolce and Elegante flutes are actually handmade. I have noticed that the marketing materials have changed greatly and there is no actual mentioning of these flutes being "handmade". I only say this because someone brought this to my attention recently, and all of the models have changed very much since I had my Pearl. Just be sure to play them all. You may even find that you like one of the less expensive flutes more. It happens :)

Basically, don't buy a flute based on what others say about it or based on options available. Buy a flute that you can afford after testing several various other brands in the same price range.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:06 pm

Absolutely. Try everything you can. Quality control has been quite good these past few years. I know when I tried some pearls, I liked them, I liked the tone, and smoothness.... but it was missing that ..... magical factor that I think a flute should have for me as a player. I found that 'magical factor' with Miyazawa, and even though the tone was slightly less subtle in my opinion, I believe it was more of an aspect of being completely unfamiliar with the instrument. So, when you try an instrument, you should know pretty quickly if it is the one for you.

I think the Elegant series [ and dolce] are handmade..... or at least finished by hand [ mechanism finished, hand cut headjoint etc.] because in the brochure I have from pearl it does say 'hand craftsmanship'.....

On the note of Split E Mechs.... I love them. Even though I dont have much of a problem with the E3, I find their tone [E3] [ on well made instruments] much more attractive than flutes without the spit E. Also, I have found that when articulating quick passages that start on the E3 [ the runs in Charles T. Griffes "Poem" for example] the notes didnt collide as easily [the venting affected it in a way that the notes didnt just turn into a gliss of sorts]. So, when I get my new flute in [ I put the down payment on it last week], it will have the split E along with a few other things.


And as for the comment about liking the less expensive flutes more: I myself found that the flute I liked best from Miyazawa was one of their lowest handcrafted models. I had the budget to purchase an all sterling silver instrument, but the one I ended up picking was mostly nickle silver [sterling head w/ 14k riser, and nickle silver body, foot and keys] [ and it leaves and extra 2k in my pocket after getting all of the extra options I wanted :D ].

So, you may very well like a lower model if you try them all. I know that in my situation, I did.

Sorry if this seemed unorganized, but I just wanted to comment on about everything.... and it ended up in no particular order... :oops: :lol:

c_otter
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Post by c_otter » Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:50 pm

I found that magical quality with a Williams flute... sigh

At least I sound better on the silver than the gold flutes.

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