Buying a new flute; Help needed.

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briolette
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Post by briolette »

concertino wrote: I do not really know that much about the lower end flutes, but I suggest at least getting a solid silver flute. I strongly do not suggest a Gemeinhardt
Best of luck with your choice
Well, frankly Miyazawa makes some amazing silver plated flutes (I tried a thick walled 402 model that was bloody fantastic) that could easily blow some solid silver flutes out of the water.
Although Gemeinhardts aren't for everyone, I do think they are ideal flutes for some. Is it a problem with the mechanism, consistency or whatever? I'm curious. One of the flutes I happen to play on is a Gemeinhart purchased back in the 90's and it's held up incredibly well.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 »

Phineas wrote:
I think this would be a good time for the elders on this board to put a FAQ together about buying new flutes. This way we can keep a neutral handle one discussions like this. Say the word, and I will start one. Between Flutepic06, Fluteguy18, Melizard, fluttiegurl, and a few others, we should be able to come up with a pretty good guide/FAQ.
I think that's an excellent idea, Phineas, and I would be more than happy to help contribute to that Buying a new flute/flute myths thread. It think it would also be great if we could get the admin to post it as a sticky at the top of board, so that it is always easily accessible. Say the word, and I will contact the admin.

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

flutepicc06

I will start on it, and pass it around for feed back. I will search through the message and compile the questions.

Phineas

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 »

Count me in! I would be glad to help out with this one.

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sidekicker
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Post by sidekicker »

This is such a personal issue with so many variables involved that this is my best advice: since you appear to be in a large metro area (Indy) and dealing with I presume a large music store, have them acquire several different brands at both the intermediate and professional level on a trial basis, then go down there and spend a day or two trying them all out. I'd be surprised if they were unable to do that for you. If not, check around for another music dealer who would be willing. It's important for you to be able to compare them all and see which suits your personal needs. I did this very thing a couple of weeks ago with headjoints; I had to drive 3.5 hours to make it happen and it took two weekend trips, but it was well worth it because I got to do immediate comparisons, and a lot of them (the dealer I worked with was able to get about 20 different gold heads from 6-7 different makers).

I know I'll get darts thrown at me for saying this, but I, personally, hate Miyazawa products. I've tried their flutes and their heads over the years (as recently as 2 weeks ago, a couple of sorry gold headjoints, IMO) and, at least for my playing style and preferences, they are very unimpressive. You'll get a big brassy sound in the lower register, but the higher you go, in my experience, the worse it gets. Sorry to all the Miyazawa lovers, but that's one brand I always avoid. Just my opinion. I know there are lots of people who love theirs. I guess I just run into all the duds that fell off the assembly line.

But -- back on subject. Ask your music dealer if it's possible for them to acquire several brands. You are likely going to have to specify exactly which ones, a price range you are willing to work with, and possibly not be able to try one b/c a particular company does not or will not consider your store an authorized dealer; I think that's unlikely, though. Most reputable flute makers have a trial policy, and will work with music stores to accommodate a customer who is needing to do a thorough comparison before making the investment in another instrument.

Good luck!

SK

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drumajorchick
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Post by drumajorchick »

I think that the FAQ would be great. I prefer geimenhardt over armstrong. I have never had a problem with any of my flutes. I have sent my flute to the shop once due to my fault.

concertino
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Post by concertino »

I have discovered that although Gemeinhardts can make very beautiful music, the mechanism bends easily and makes the flutes very hard to play. I do not mean what you all think I do. It is simply my opinion that when I played a very expensive Miyazawa it was supposedly tuned to A442 although it sounded much, much sharper. It is well know at least by some people, that Japanese flutes are generally sharper than western made ones.
I then played a Trevor James, which was much more in tune.
Perhaps you don't understand what I mean, but I have sensitive ears, and could not bear to own that particular Miyazawa.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 »

concertino wrote:I have discovered that although Gemeinhardts can make very beautiful music, the mechanism bends easily and makes the flutes very hard to play. I do not mean what you all think I do. It is simply my opinion that when I played a very expensive Miyazawa it was supposedly tuned to A442 although it sounded much, much sharper. It is well know at least by some people, that Japanese flutes are generally sharper than western made ones.
I then played a Trevor James, which was much more in tune.
Perhaps you don't understand what I mean, but I have sensitive ears, and could not bear to own that particular Miyazawa.
Gemeinhardt mechs do not bend any more easily than any other brand of flute, and in fact, the mech is much more hardy than some. As for the Miyazawa, A442 is A442 anywhere. The Japanese scales may be (and probably are) different, but there is not a Japanese 442 and an American 442. Assuming the flute was not mislabeled (which I doubt it was), it was at A442. The Miyazawa and it's scale may not have fit your playing well, but they are excellent flutes, and IMHO, actually have a pretty good scale. I also have sensitive ears, and intonation has never been a problem for me with Miyas.
Last edited by flutepicc06 on Tue Dec 12, 2006 3:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas »

Throw out the scifi, the Miyazawa is a great flute. I had the rare opportunity to try almost all of their models on the same day, not too far from where they are made in Japan, before I bought the one I have. It is starting to become my favorite instrument. I play on my Pearl the best, however as time goes along I am playing better on the Miyazawa. Classical pieces especially shine on the Miyazawa!

If the flute sounds right an in tune, that is all that matters. "Scales" and "A=440" are for flute designers and marketers. Let us leave the science fiction to them and just play!

Phineas

MeLizzard
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Post by MeLizzard »

They don't seem to bend too easily, but a lot of them sure appear to be out of adjustment constantly!
"There is no 'Try'; there is only 'Do'."--Yoda

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drumajorchick
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Post by drumajorchick »

I agree that the Gemeinhardt flute doesnt bend any easier than others. I just personally believe that it is a good quality flute for a reasonable price.
Music is the Fundamental Skill of Life!!!

DFlute
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flutes and playing in tune

Post by DFlute »

concertino wrote:I have discovered that although Gemeinhardts can make very beautiful music, the mechanism bends easily and makes the flutes very hard to play. I do not mean what you all think I do. It is simply my opinion that when I played a very expensive Miyazawa it was supposedly tuned to A442 although it sounded much, much sharper. It is well know at least by some people, that Japanese flutes are generally sharper than western made ones.
I then played a Trevor James, which was much more in tune.
Perhaps you don't understand what I mean, but I have sensitive ears, and could not bear to own that particular Miyazawa.
Hi Concertino,
I play/own a gemeinhardt...and you are right ... they do sound pretty... at least when played alone...(without accompaniment)...however...at least mine.. seems to play flat...no matter how much I adjust the head joint, the player, the metal temp (by warming up), when I play with others, especially stringed players... it is like a broken record...'the flute's flat' :oops: ..
i actually purchased one of those electronic tuners...and practice with it... when I adjust the blowing to bring the light to green...then the actual note sounds windy and funky(not in a good 1970's way)... like a fourth grade first week flute student...with an abnoid problem. :oops:
I swear... sometimes... the longer I play...the more my awareness develops of how little I know... and how much I still must develop...
:? :cry:
I am...a hopeless fluter :(
those who hear not the music think the dancers mad

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drumajorchick
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Post by drumajorchick »

I also own a gemeinhardt. Maybe my flute is just weird, but my flute tends to play sharp if anything. Dflute, I dont know if your electronic tuner does this, there is an electronic tuner that has a microphone that you can attach to your flute. That way you can watch the tuning of your instument and play at the same time. It tunes to your vibrations of your instrument. It is quite a neat device. If your tuner does not contain that, I highly advice you to invest in one. I know that H and H music store carries them.
Music is the Fundamental Skill of Life!!!

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 »

There's really no need to invest in such gadgets, IMHO. You can play and watch your tuning on any tuner without difficult. DFlute, learning to adjust with your air can be difficult, but is worth the effort. Keep doing the tuner work to the point that you're comfortable that your pitch is correct, and then do tone work without allowing your pitch to sag. If you're using the concept of "blow harder if your flat and less if you're sharp," that could explain a lot too. Rather than changing how much air or how fast the air is traveling, change the angle that your airstream comes in contact with the air reed (edge of the embouchure hole). If you need to bring pitch up, raise the air stream, and if you need to bring it down, lower the airstream.

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Twilight91
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Post by Twilight91 »

I am currently trying out a Sonare SF7000 and I'll have it for about three weeks. I've had my director look at it, but is there anything I should be looking for on this flute? I've only had it for now 24 hours, and have played with my ensemble today for about 90 minutes, and so far I love it.

Here are some of what it has to offer...
-Solid Silver Throughout
-C# and D# Roller
-Gizmo Key (B Foot)
-French pointed arms
-Inline G
-White-Gold Springs
-Open Hole

The only thing that it doesn't have really is the Split E Mech. How important is that particular feature when buying a flute?
*What the heart makes cloudy, the head makes very clear.*

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