The dreaded Turn-around

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wonderflute
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The dreaded Turn-around

Post by wonderflute » Mon Jun 13, 2005 10:43 am

Hello! I am new to this website, but not new to flute. I have been practicing my scales more lately, and one day, I actually played the chromatic scale perfectly, and 8 times in a row. :D But I usually always find myself messing up at the turn-around. When I switch from the high C (C4) and start coming back down, I always mess up my double tounging. ( I slur up and tongue down) On a few rare occasions, I have not, but it always has and is very difficult for me to do that without completely screwing up. I am a very accomplished musician, but I can't remember a single audition where I didn't have to restart my chromatic scale. I'm working on it, and my mother is going insane, having to listen to my shrieking high high high high F. :lol: Anyway, has anyone ever heard of a book that has audition pieces in it? I saw a girl at my Lion's band tryout, and she had a book of some kind, that had arranged audition pieces from hard tryouts in it. I don't know :roll: Well, thanks for letting me bore you to death :wink:
Bye! 8)
are you suggesting coconuts migrate?!!

Burke
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Re: The dreaded Turn-around

Post by Burke » Tue Jun 14, 2005 1:53 am

wonderflute wrote:Hello! I am new to this website, but not new to flute.
Welcome, Wonderflute. I'm glad you found us. I am new to the flute, and am not an accomplished musician, so I'm looking forward to learning from you. I've been here since around December of '04, and I've met some great people. Someone will come along to address your question about a book with audition pieces, I am sure.
Well, thanks for letting me bore you to death :wink:
Bye! 8)
You're quite welcome, but please know that you haven't bored us at all!

I haven't been active here as of late, so I've missed a few of the newcomer's posts, but I welcome everyone who has joined. The people here are wonderful, and it's a great place to find support and camaraderie.

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Phineas
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Post by Phineas » Tue Jun 14, 2005 11:39 am

Hello! I am new to this website, but not new to flute. I have been practicing my scales more lately, and one day, I actually played the chromatic scale perfectly, and 8 times in a row.
First of all, welcome to the website. Second, scales are the most under rated "TO DOs" in music. This whole trick is not to memorize the fingerings, but to get to know how your instrument sounds. When doing songs from memory, it kind of helps to be able to distinguish between B and C. You would be surpirsed how many people are decent players, but do not have a good ear. These same people are lost when you pull the chart from in front of them.
But I usually always find myself messing up at the turn-around. When I switch from the high C (C4) and start coming back down, I always mess up my double tounging. ( I slur up and tongue down)
Do not feel alone. Altissmo fingering give everyone a hard time, at least for a while. Often times for speed, you can resort to a "Speed" or trill fingering. The main thing is not try to play fast. Always practice slowly. Before you know it speed will come. Maybe sooner than you may think.
I'm working on it, and my mother is going insane, having to listen to my shrieking high high high high F.


Are you talking about F3, or F4. F3 is normal, but F4 is a stretch! After D4, I just kind of goof around. If I need a sound that high, I just pull out the old Piccolo. I like hanging out more toward the lower end. Practicing with low B and C. It is fun to try to play some tunes an octave higher. For example, try playing "No More Blues" By Carlos Jobim starting on the third octave at tempo. THat would give you a good excercise for your altissmo register...lol
Well, thanks for letting me bore you to death
Not boring at all, take care

Phineas

biggzh
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Post by biggzh » Wed Jun 15, 2005 5:44 am

YAY SUPER HIGH F!!!!

If you're taking the chromatic scale up to high f, then you may be taking it up to high (not as easy to finger fast 4 me, but it would be a nice goal 4 summer).... If it's up to high C, then just keep working A, Bb, B, C, B, Bb, A, and then combine it into your scale.

Hope that helps

wonderflute
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Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 10:31 am
Location: Mississippi

Post by wonderflute » Wed Jun 15, 2005 12:11 pm

Thanks everyone! I also find myself wondering if anyone here has completely gotten through a book by Brookes. There isn't any special title to it except the author's name. It is really hard, and even after 2 years, I'm still not off the 24th page!! Of course, that's just because I skip around :wink: I've been doing the high high F thing because the concept in that book,(and I think Trevor Wye's) is that if you go beyond the goal note, (in the case of the chromatic scale, C) that note won't seem so hard, it will be too easy if you're going 5 notes higher than that when you're practicing. This method, though, I can admit does get very frustrating at times :shock: My dogs always howl when I play, and going that high, I just have to stop and laugh, I mean, it's a dog serenade TO a flute serenade. :wink: Well, I'm glad that I'm able to talk to some of you guys thanks to the genius of Bill Gates (Gees, I probably have made ya'll waste 2 minutes of your life! :lol:
Thanks again, Bye!
are you suggesting coconuts migrate?!!

biggzh
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Post by biggzh » Thu Jun 16, 2005 5:21 am

off topic, but Bill Gates didn't Invent the Windows operating system, he just took the idea (and blueprints) from someone else.

Mango
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Post by Mango » Thu Jun 16, 2005 7:08 pm

biggzh wrote:off topic, but Bill Gates didn't Invent the Windows operating system, he just took the idea (and blueprints) from someone else.
That's what happens when you screw off in school and then drop out of college! :D
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kodalyflutist
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Post by kodalyflutist » Tue Jun 21, 2005 7:07 am

Have you tried the alternate high C fingering? It is basically high B without the thumb. That's the only difference. You may have to aim the air up a little bit and blow a little faster, it can be stuffy. This fingering is super for when you need quick facility, especially at a forte dynamic. It tends to be a little flat, which can be a good thing (the other fingering is notoriously sharp and I only use it when I'm playing sustained pp). I usually modify the regular fingering by adding various RH fingers to bring the pitch down.

Isolate the turn-around. (B - C - B) Using the alternate fingering, it should be a piece of cake, except for the air issue. ..but if you are practicing up to high F, I don't think you'll find it too difficult. When B-C-B is easy, then add Bb, and play Bb - B - C - B - Bb. Each time you will add one more note, but only when the previous "corner" feels like a good friend, instead of a stranger. "Listen" to your fingers; put your brains in your fingertips. Notice whether you are using more pressure on one finger than another, squeezing in general, or not completely coordinating the lifting and placing of fingers. You are trying to form good muscle memory, so any tension you are using will translate into facility problems as speed increases.

As was mentioned before, don't practice fast. Speed will come when the fingerings begin to feel comfortable. You CAN play this turn; it's a matter of simplifying the task into achievable goals, and then sticking to it. You must be very careful to pay attention to what your fingers and embouchure and airstream are doing together. If you take time and care with licking this problem, you will actually learn much faster. Sometimes using a metronome can help you keep track of where you practiced on a previous day. Don't feel the need to increase your speed many clicks in one practice session; your brain needs time to process and move the learning from short-term memory to long-term memory. Many times, the next day will be easier just for this reason. All the more reason to perfect every repetition, rather than trying to speed up too much, too soon.

Best wishes to you!
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"Music belongs to everyone." ~ Zoltán Kodály

kodalyflutist
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Re: The dreaded Turn-around

Post by kodalyflutist » Tue Jun 21, 2005 7:25 am

Anyway, has anyone ever heard of a book that has audition pieces in it?

There are many orchestral excerpt books; it depends on what you are looking for. I love the Clarke "Orchestral Extracts" (Flute World catalogue number 46T05FWC8484). The Baxtresser Orchestral Excerpts is really great for a first excerpt collection (FW cat. #46P050041171). You can also get a CD with her performing and discussing the excerpts. (FW cat. #A1SU0DCD159). This is not an ad for Flute World, but I'm just trying to give you a place to go look. (Fluteworld.com/)

I do not know of any band excerpt books, but they may be out there. Better for you to get your hands on complete band parts if you know there is an audition including that. Incidently, you can get entire flute orchestral parts by Kalmus, also available at Flute World.

Hope this helps!
http://musicmind.homestead.com

"Music belongs to everyone." ~ Zoltán Kodály

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