Flute Pedagogy

Advanced Technique, Performance Questions, Auditions, Recording, etc.

Moderators: Classitar, pied_piper, Phineas

Post Reply
User avatar
Fox
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:39 am
Location: In the forest

Flute Pedagogy

Post by Fox » Fri Oct 16, 2009 8:13 am

I have been working on Trevor Wye's books "A Beginners Book for the Flute", and Practice Book: Tone and Technique. My question is, as I finish the Beginners book for the flute where do I go next? I will continue going through the practice books. I'm looking for books for intermediate level that would expand on what I've learned from the beginner's book.

fluteguy18
Posts: 2311
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 3:11 pm

Post by fluteguy18 » Fri Oct 16, 2009 6:16 pm

Well, I'm not sure what to tell you other than there are 5 practice books. And you will NEVER get out of them. Even though you may have worked through them, you need to still work on them. Here I am, going through my preparation process for conservatory auditions for Grad School, and I'm still working on them. There is ALWAYS something to work on in those 5 books. Always.

User avatar
Fox
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:39 am
Location: In the forest

Post by Fox » Sat Oct 17, 2009 3:55 am

Thanks fluteguy18. I do plan to continue to use the practice books, but I'm also looking for some intermediate books that would supplement the practice books. I've tried to do the practices in the practice books as they correspond to what I'm learning in the beginners book. I'm looking for books that would follow the beginners books.

apicultrice
Posts: 39
Joined: Thu Jan 04, 2007 2:55 pm
Location: Nashville, TN

Post by apicultrice » Sat Oct 24, 2009 8:51 pm

Hi Fox,

Wye has a second volume of the beginner series - have you looked at that one? Concurrent with the second volume of beginner stuff, my students might also choose to work out of his "Very Easy Flute Treasury," which has a nice variety of pieces.

After they finish these, we usually will go into the etude book "Melodious and Progressive Studies, Vol. 1" and I'll supplement that with my own technique exercises (or one or two easier exercises from Taffanel and Gaubert.)

I also like the intermediate Rubank book and the Rubank duet collections.

Hope this helps!

User avatar
Fox
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:39 am
Location: In the forest

Post by Fox » Mon Oct 26, 2009 6:07 am

apicultrice,
Yes, I am aware of the volume 2 for Beginners books. I will check out the Melodious and T&G. Thanks!

Fox

stewyflute13
Posts: 80
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 6:56 pm
Location: New Mexico

Post by stewyflute13 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 1:09 am

Well, the next big books to get are indeed the Taffanel and Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises and then the Moyse books "De la Sonorite" and "Tone Development through Interpretation." You'll need to have the help of a good teacher, though, to get through these studies in an efficient manner. Try to get some etude books too such as Anderson etudes or even Altes if you're ready for them.

Have fun!

Arianna
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:28 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Post by Arianna » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:00 am

Ok, maybe I am not thinking of the correct Beginner Books by Wye, but I don't see those preparing you enough to jump into Anderson, Altes, and Melodious and Progressive Studies. I know in Beginner Book 2 you get harder keys and rhythms, but they are still very short pieces and not near as technically demanding as the other books mentioned. I can see the benefit of doing Taffanel and Gaubert or the other Wye books. Not knowing your level personally, this is just a stab, but I think something like Moyse 24 Little Studies with Variations. These are between 3-5 lines usually (more like the length of things you have in the Wye Beginner book) and they start with a simple piece for you to focus on tone and dynamics. Then they move to more complex variations to focus more on rhythm and articulation. The first couple of pages are pretty basic, but after you get further in you will feel more challenged. They also go through all 24 keys (I think). I would recommend something like that along with a solo book. But, again, I haven't personally heard you. I just would hate to see you get some of those 1-2 page etudes and get really frustrated! Good luck!

stewyflute13
Posts: 80
Joined: Wed Apr 29, 2009 6:56 pm
Location: New Mexico

Post by stewyflute13 » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:59 am

yeah, on second thought, i think Arianna is right..

I actually never went through all the wye books, just the tone book. So it sure sounds like things like Altes, etc. would be a big leap for ya.

Make sure you have a good teacher, most importantly, I mean they will lead you through all of this. =)

User avatar
Fox
Posts: 134
Joined: Sun Mar 09, 2008 6:39 am
Location: In the forest

Post by Fox » Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:22 am

stewyflute13 wrote:Well, the next big books to get are indeed the Taffanel and Gaubert 17 Daily Exercises and then the Moyse books "De la Sonorite"
Arianna wrote:I can see the benefit of doing Taffanel and Gaubert... Not knowing your level personally, this is just a stab, but I think something like Moyse 24 Little Studies with Variations.
I was looking into getting "De la Sonorite" and Taffanel and Gaubert as I get closer to finishing Beginners book 2. I'll also keep in mind "24 Little Studies with Variations".
What I've been doing at the moment is going through Beginners book 2 and parts from each of the five Practice books. Just a little bit each day.
stewyflute13 wrote:Make sure you have a good teacher, most importantly, I mean they will lead you through all of this. =)
I've actually just recently found an instructor. It took me a while but this person sounds promising after our talk on the phone. I'm going to take a lesson with him in a couple weeks.

Arianna
Posts: 44
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 5:28 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Post by Arianna » Fri Mar 19, 2010 11:26 am

Great! A teacher can help you so much more then we can via internet! Wonderful! Several of the books mentioned (Taffanel and Gaubert, the Wye series, Moyse books...) can be used at such a variety of levels. I have been playing 20ish years and have a performance degree and still use them...I probably see more value in them now then I did when I started. Good luck! Maybe wait for that lesson before buying tons of music (although quite fun) and bring some of these ideas and questions your potential teacher.

Post Reply