Marching

Advanced Technique, Performance Questions, Auditions, Recording, etc.

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FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Marching

Post by FluterJenn » Mon Jun 23, 2003 9:41 pm

Hi, I''m not sure where I would put this message because I
haven''t seen anyone post anything about marching. I just need some advice. I
will be starting my first year of marching this year and several people have
told me things about flutes and marching. One person has told me that when
marching you shouldn''t have open holded flutes..? And another has told me
that you should have two flutes one good one for concert band and one for
marching so if it rains then your good one doesn''t get ruined..? Could
someone tell me if this is true or if they are just "rumors", and if anyone has
any extra tips for me on my first year of marching that would be great. Thanks,
Jenn

AG950Flute
Posts: 139
Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 4:24 pm

Marching

Post by AG950Flute » Tue Jun 24, 2003 2:45 am

Jenn, Some of the rumors you have heard are true. When I
marched in high school, I used my "old" flute in case of bad weather. I think in
principle it's a good idea to have a back up flute just in case. However, here
are my thoughts. If you don't have a back up flute to play outside here are a
few reminders. Playing outdoors (in good weather) will not damage your
instrument. I always think of the Boston Pops and how they play outside
(granted, their under a covering, but the outside weather isn't effecting their
flutes). And many other professional ensembles play outside during the summer,
weather permitting. Now, when it comes to rain, there is a much higher risk at
damaging your instrument. If you don't have a back up instrument these may be
some ideas to take into consideration. See if the school has an older instrument
that you can borrow during the rental season. Or talk to your parents about
possibly renting an instrument for few months while you are marching, I think in
general marching season is September-December. Tell them that in the long run
renting an instrument may be cheaper than repairing yours. Best of luck, and
have fun!
Courtney
Morton

strawberryfields
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2003 12:57 pm

Marching

Post by strawberryfields » Tue Jun 24, 2003 2:40 pm

Hey! Yeah well I spent a good few years marching and heres
what I've learnt, Yes you should have two flutes for concerts and marching,
keep your good one for concerts, of course! Posture is important while marching,
try to hold your flute high up, ie vertically. I used to always let mine tilt
down and that got me into trouble! Also take breathing carefully into
consideration when practising your music for marching because its easy to get
winded! About open hled flutes, I suppose what you heard is true because if it
rains the rainwater could get into your flute and cause damage. So keep the open
hole for your concerts instead! Hope that helps, good luck and heres to many fun
years of marching ahead [:)]
Strawberry

FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Marching

Post by FluterJenn » Sun Jun 29, 2003 3:14 pm

Hi, Thanks for all your input. My mom said that she would buy
me a used flute for marching. The past few days I've been searching for a
resonabily priced flute that isn't damaged too much, and I think I have found
one. It's a Jupiter closed hole that was only used for about 2 years. Thanks
again for your help, Jenn

tarzaflute
Posts: 131
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2003 6:59 am

Marching

Post by tarzaflute » Mon Jun 30, 2003 1:20 am

Hi. I don't march at all and I can't see when I ever will,
but wat you said about open hole flutes made me think... it might be a good idea
to have closed hole, not just because of the weather issue, but when you are
marching, you may not have as much control over your technique, therefore you
fingers would have more chance of slipping, and the tone holes may not be fully
covered. Also, if you're playing outdoors in changing weather, your pads might
get a bit sticky, they do this indoors too when the weather is constantly
changing. If you find they are getting sticky from this just slip some cigarette
paper underneath than squeeze while pulling it out from under the tone holes.
Obviously if your squeeze too tight the paper will just wrip. I hope this has
helped a bit [8)]
Tara!

BandSlave
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2002 11:20 pm

Marching

Post by BandSlave » Tue Jul 01, 2003 2:31 pm

Hey there, I agree with everyone else, you should have two
flutes, the weather I've played in made my marching flute rather icky until it
was cleaned, but I think the closed holed vs. open holed for marching goes
either way, but it would probably be easier with a close holed flue in bad
weather. -Abby
Rock
on!

sakuramimato
Posts: 95
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2004 3:39 am

Marching

Post by sakuramimato » Fri Jan 23, 2004 4:37 am

I know, this marching thread was posted a long time ago, but I
can't let a marching thread slip by. ;) I've had three years of marching
experience (as of December 2003); three in parade and one in field show. Here's
what I've learned in the past years: - Having a separate flute just for
marching (preferrably your student flute if you've upgraded to an intermediate
model) is possibly the best way to go during marching season. Since marching
season puts all of the wear and tear in your instrument, I would suggest using a
flute that is still functional, but not something you would use for concert
season. And I agree, you should set aside the "nice flute" for concert season
while your back-up is with you through marching season. In CA, preparation (aka
summer band camp) for field season (which also transfers to parade since parade
is the basics of field) begins in August with competition officially starting
mid-September running all the way to mid- to late-December for the marching
season. Now, that's a lot of time out marching, and also can put lots of wear
and damage onto your instrument. - NEVER leave your instrument on the cement -
NEVER leave your flute face down so that the keys are being dug into the ground
- I would suggest the use of a [silver or plastic] piccolo during marching
season as they don't receive much damage during marching season. - Watch out
for sprinkler heads and systems (the sprinklers turned on on my school's full
music ensemble, drenching all the pit, battery, colorguard, and band equipment)
- Take proper care of your instrument after practice ends or whenever you are
given a break by giving it a quick polish, swabbing the tubes, and spotting your
instrument for any perspiration that makes contact with it. - NEVER twirl your
flute!! (A guy in my band kept twirling his nickel flute, thinking it was a
baton, and he was punished by having to run the tracks three times) It's all
basic in marching season, but if you're planning on using a flute during
marching season, make sure that it's a flute that you won't mind getting a
little scratched up, dented and chipped every once in a while. A couple of tips
(that hopefully proved to be useful) on marching. By the way, are you doing
parade or field show marching?

Cleartone
Posts: 63
Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 2:56 pm

Marching

Post by Cleartone » Fri Jan 23, 2004 12:21 pm

Well, this is dependent on what kind of flute your are talking
about. Obviously not a $30,000 platinum one right? But you did mention opened
holed flute so I am to take it you have at least a decent intermediate flute. If
you don't have another flute to take, go ahead and use the one you have. It
won't hurt it. Remember that your saliva gets into the instrument when you play
just like rain would which is the only thing you have to worry about when
marching. Just remember to clean it out well after you are done marching. The
tempature does affect the metal of the flute. If it is cold your flute is going
to be an ice cube. I used to just blow air through the tube occasionally to keep
it warm. In high school I was the the student band leader and used a flute as a
baton. Ha Ha. I still have that flute and it still plays well. As for the
comments about posture and technique, I wouldn't worry too much about that.
Outside sound does not carry well, so the flute section is usually muffled by
the brass and drums. As long as you are doing your part to the best of your
ability I wouldn't worry about trying to be Rampal when marching down the
street. Although it takes a little practice to keep your lips on the flute while
marching. Also, play outside more often. This goes for all you flautists out
there. This is good for the spirit and forces you to improvise more. All the
great flutists can improvise even the strictly classical ones. you know,
fermatas? One fun thing to do is to go to a schoolyard that has a U shaped brick
walled building and play around with the echoes of the sound you create.

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Marching

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Fri Jan 23, 2004 2:54 pm

open holed has nothing to do with it but i have a student
model i use for marching because if it rains it gets broken whatever you do
cover up your flute in bad weather
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

FluterJenn
Posts: 71
Joined: Sun Feb 09, 2003 11:12 am

Marching

Post by FluterJenn » Fri Jan 23, 2004 3:27 pm

yes it does. because it is much harder to march while keeping
your fingers on the holes, and the pads get ruined faster. also, open holded
flutes are most of the time really expensive, so marching with it wouldnt be too
good of an idea.

flutietootie4lyfe
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Feb 26, 2003 3:44 pm

Marching

Post by flutietootie4lyfe » Fri Jan 23, 2004 6:04 pm

I realize that but i was referring to technical reasons and
closed and open holed flutes generally take the same time to wear out by
marching
~Kendall
"Q: How many classical flutists does it take to change a light bulb? A: Only
one, but she'll pay $5,000 for a gold-plated ladder." --Kathy Russell

Goddess of Flute
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2004 11:53 am

Marching

Post by Goddess of Flute » Thu Feb 05, 2004 11:20 pm

Buy a cheap, reliable flute. Dont go all out for you MB flute.
But hey, if youre just going to go out and buy a flute just for marching band,
why not get a piccolo instead? They are heard better, and wayyyy more fun to
play. [;)] As for open hole v. closed hole, it dosnet really matter- but if
youre just getting any old flute to play for MB whats the point of spending
extra cash for an open hole? Go cheap!
Support Live Music!!
Kiss a Musician!!! :-*

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flutietootie85
Posts: 16
Joined: Fri Mar 14, 2003 5:42 pm

Marching

Post by flutietootie85 » Fri Feb 06, 2004 8:15 pm

I'm in my 2nd year of marching band. So I agree that you
should have 2 flutes while marching because in marching band you always have the
risk of it getting wet or falling off bleachers and stuff. I used my old flute
when I did it before I switched to piccolo for this season. I also agree with
keeping it parralell to the ground because it makes it look a lot better and you
won't get yelled at. I heard that if you're having problems with that u can
place a tennis ball in ur right armpit area and if you begin to move down the
ball will inflict pain on you, but rests comfortably when it is held right. I
don't know if it works or not, I haven't tried it. But I wish you luck and if
you're doing it for football games have lots of fun! Cuz I know I always have
fun marching! fluties rock!
-Doctors may save life, but musicians make life worth living-

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Lemonpawz
Posts: 5
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 6:16 pm

Marching

Post by Lemonpawz » Sun Mar 14, 2004 10:49 pm

if you can, I'd rather invest in a cheap used piccolo. Why?
Because doubling on picc is not only awesome, but it's smaller size will aid
you well in marching band! And if it rainds you can just slip it up your sleve.
They also make a louder,higher octave sound and stick out more. ACtually, I;d
sugesst switching to a horn...

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saiphrigel
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Jun 23, 2004 8:25 pm

Marching

Post by saiphrigel » Wed Jun 23, 2004 9:29 pm

I'm assuming that we're talking about a competing marching
band, performing music and drill on a football field, not a parade band. I
played piccolo in marching band for 3 years back in high school (drum major year
4), and it is definitely the way to go. I didn't worry so much about weather
wrecking my flute. The inside gets wet when you play anyway--you just need to
keep up on maintenance. I was more concerned about the travelling damages
incurred in parking lots, fields, and especially school buses! Also, anyone who
has ever marched with a flute will remember how hard it is to shift left while
playing flute! The piccolo solves this...it practically fits in a pocket, and
it's shorter, so no shifting difficulty. And with the higher range, you can be
heard, despite the wailing brass section!

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