Question on flute lessons...

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venerosoviolin
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Question on flute lessons...

Post by venerosoviolin » Tue Aug 01, 2006 1:25 pm

I was wondering if someone might be able to suggest a lesson book series. If someone was learning to play the flute is there a set of lesson books that any of you prefer? What other recital books would you suggest as well? Also etudes...? I would really appreciate any input on this.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 1:50 pm

here is my 2 cents.

I took lessons for a very brief period before i joined band in 6th grade. the band used a series of three books called "Standards of Excellence", and then when I started up lessons again, I was at a college level, and we started with orchestral pieces in prep for my auditions for college. Back to the point, this book has a fairly nice format for beginners, and will take the player up to a high school level of playing. However, this is a book we used for band, so I am not really sure how well it would work by itself. (I think it would be fine, but I am sure there are better ones out there).

Because I dont really know the players skill level, I cant really recommend any recital books or etude books. Some that I have used are: Partita in A minor (J.S. Bach, and used as recital), and an etude book I am using right now (i dont like it very much, so I will find a new one soon) is Selected Studies for flute by H. Voxman. The scales are nice in the back (major, minor, harmonic, melodic, etc. and these scales in thirds etc.). Another work/ etude book I have that I really like, I dont know the title of. It was the first book in a series of books by Robert Cavally. It has all of the scales like the previously mentioned book, but not in thirds, and the studies are pretty good for technique.

just my .02

sherbert789
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Post by sherbert789 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 3:03 pm

I use the Rubank series to teach from. They publish them in Elementary, Intermediate, and 2 Advanced methods, so you can start at an appropriate level. The Elementary method is a lot of tunes and simple things for a less experienced player, but as you move up in the ranks the books have lots of scale and ornamentation studies and lots of etudes and duets to study. It's a pretty old method, but I think it's a classic.

Good luck!!!!

venerosoviolin
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Post by venerosoviolin » Tue Aug 01, 2006 3:45 pm

The student is high school level. She is beyond the others in her band and needs more to do. Thanks for your help. If anyone else has any input, I'd be glad to hear it.

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 4:39 pm

I like the Trevor Wye books myself. There is a whole series of them, with a range of focuses from tone to articulation, and even the "omnibus" edition which includesfive books in one volume. They have tons of information and exercises, and can have a huge impact on the quality of the student's playing. Etude-wise, there are the classic Taffanel and Gaubert 17 daily exercises that might be useful, as well as many other similar books. I know Marcel Moyse (a terrific flutist who is very well known for De La Sonorite) wrote a whole range of books touching on various topics which might be interesting to you, though I have not used them myself, so can't comment on their effectiveness.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:43 pm

Sorry about my first comment. I was under the impression that "learning" meant that they had never touched a flute before. however, Right O flutepicc06. the books you mentioned are the ones that I will be working in this fall (and will probably continue doing so until I die, because music is never perfect).

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:47 pm

fluteguy18 wrote:the books you mentioned are the ones that I will be working in this fall (and will probably continue doing so until I die, because music is never perfect).
That's so true...If there were one "perfect" way to play music, it would get awful boring....You need to constantly be striving to improve, or you just stagnate. I see that you're a performance major....Do you mind me asking which university you attend, and who you study with?

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:50 pm

I will begin studying at Eastern Kentucky University with Kristen Kean (I will be a Freshman). She is the flute prof. there, but over the summer I study with Jana Flygstad, the flute professor at Centre College, and Georgetown College.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:53 pm

where do/did you study?

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flutepicc06
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Post by flutepicc06 » Tue Aug 01, 2006 9:57 pm

Same as you, I'm headed for freshman year as a Music Education major at University of Northern Colorado. I'll be studying with Nicole Riner, and until the semester starts, I study with Sandra Kipp (prof. at Cal State Northridge), and Mary Predmore.

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Post by FltnPicc_David » Wed Aug 02, 2006 7:05 pm

fluteguy18 wrote:here is my 2 cents.

I took lessons for a very brief period before i joined band in 6th grade. the band used a series of three books called "Standards of Excellence", and then when I started up lessons again, I was at a college level, and we started with orchestral pieces in prep for my auditions for college. Back to the point, this book has a fairly nice format for beginners, and will take the player up to a high school level of playing. However, this is a book we used for band, so I am not really sure how well it would work by itself. (I think it would be fine, but I am sure there are better ones out there).

Because I dont really know the players skill level, I cant really recommend any recital books or etude books. Some that I have used are: Partita in A minor (J.S. Bach, and used as recital), and an etude book I am using right now (i dont like it very much, so I will find a new one soon) is Selected Studies for flute by H. Voxman. The scales are nice in the back (major, minor, harmonic, melodic, etc. and these scales in thirds etc.). Another work/ etude book I have that I really like, I dont know the title of. It was the first book in a series of books by Robert Cavally. It has all of the scales like the previously mentioned book, but not in thirds, and the studies are pretty good for technique.

just my .02
The Cavally book is titled "Melodious and Progressive Studies, Book 1." I believe there are three of them in all...
One of the books I use is titled "Indispensable Scales, Exercises & Etudes for the Developing Flutist." It really helped me learn my scales in time so i can audition for All-State. If you play piccolo, the Piccolo Practice Book by Trevor Wye and patricia Morris is good, as well..(even if the store I bought it from bought it in German... x_X) I'll buy the english copy form FluteWorld.

fluteguy18
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Post by fluteguy18 » Wed Aug 02, 2006 10:00 pm

Thanks for the title ( i used mine so much the cover fell right off, and I cant find it). Yeah the piccolo book you mentioned is great. I use it in lessons. It started to make me really analyze my piccolo dynamics. And after two months of work, I can successfully play Bolero on picc at the dynamic ppp in the upper register.

My professor will be very shocked when I arrive for my placement audition (orchestra/symphonic band) because my other professor (one in summer, one during school) was ecstatic that I could do it (she was jumping up and down) because I am only a Freshman at EKU.

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