Open holes promote correct finger placement?

Basics of Flute Playing, Tone Production and Fingerings, Using Metronomes, Scales, Tone, Studies, etc.

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eremite
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Location: Seattle, U.S.A.

Open holes promote correct finger placement?

Post by eremite » Wed Apr 02, 2014 5:11 pm

Something I've often wondered: Is it true that starting with an open holed flute forces the beginner to learn correct finger placement? If so, than why do so many plug the holes when starting, as if they were training wheels on a bike? And sure to cause controversy: There is no tonal advantage in playing with open holes; their main benefit is in extended techniques where you may want to bend notes, etc. Feel free to chime in on any of these and don't get me started on the b foot vs. c foot debate. :!:

sarastro
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Joined: Wed Feb 12, 2014 9:38 am

Re: Open holes promote correct finger placement?

Post by sarastro » Fri Apr 04, 2014 9:32 am

Only "correct" finger position in that it's correct for the open holed flute, though, yes? I just recently made the jump to an open holed model, and I've not found it to be too much of a stretch. It's always easier to go back to closed hole than the other way around.

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Phineas
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Re: Open holes promote correct finger placement?

Post by Phineas » Sun Apr 20, 2014 2:56 pm

When I wanted to transition from closed to open hole flutes, I started out on Bamboo/Cane Flutes

http://www.sunreed.com/our-products/myf ... lutes.html
http://eriktheflutemaker.com/collections/flutes

It was less about "Finger Position", and more about programming myself to cover the holes. Another thing to consider is the inline vs offset G open hole flutes. This can also make a difference.

I have had students who started on an open hole flute. The worse case is you plug a few holes.

As far as open vs close hole. It is a bunch of nonsense. You have better chances telling the difference between 2 headjoints than open vs close. I these people who start these debates spent more time playing then trolling, they would not have time for it.!!!

As far as the Bfoot vs Cfoot debate, there is none around here. Whatever you want to buy/play, buy/play it. I have both types, and unless there is something written for low B, the flutes are interchangeable.

In the end, you just have to do what you gotta do to have fun, and do your best not to suck!!! In the end the most important thing to the listener is how you perform, not what kind of instrument you are performing on. I started a crowd at a Sam Ash doing a demo on a cheap plastic thing.

http://www.samash.com/flutes/null-nuvo- ... nuvoflutex

No one cared, they just enjoyed the demo!

Phineas

fluteguy18
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Re: Open holes promote correct finger placement?

Post by fluteguy18 » Mon Apr 21, 2014 7:42 pm

eremite wrote:Something I've often wondered: Is it true that starting with an open holed flute forces the beginner to learn correct finger placement? If so, than why do so many plug the holes when starting, as if they were training wheels on a bike? And sure to cause controversy: There is no tonal advantage in playing with open holes; their main benefit is in extended techniques where you may want to bend notes, etc. Feel free to chime in on any of these and don't get me started on the b foot vs. c foot debate. :!:
I'm pretty much in agreement with Phineas on this one. Play what you like. After learning Irish flute and low whistles I've learned that the only correct finger placement is the one that works. There are some positions better than others, but it's all relative to ergonomics for your specific hand size and shape. As for why we plug the holes? I never plugged mine. I went from closed holes straight to open holes. Tonal advantage... You can't tell from offstage that's true, but the holes offer far more than extended techniques. They offer a plethora of alternate fingerings to give you the pitch and timbre that you want. That does not however mean it is a better instrument. It's just a different instrument.

B/C foot. Eh. It does make a difference in how the instrument responds (because of weight and a continuation in the harmonic series and only when the instrument is working correctly) but it's basically impossible to tell from listening alone if the flute has one footjoint or another. And the response difference is a neutral one. It's not better or worse. Just slightly different.

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